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Arche Bunker's Place aired from September 1979 to September 1983 on CBS.


For more on Archie Bunker's Place go to the All in the Family mini-page here at Sitcoms Online.


An Article from The New York Times


CBS-TV IS DROPPING ARCHIE BUNKER


By FRANK J. PRIAL


May 12, 1983


Archie Bunker, the noisy bigot who articulated the prejudices of a generation of Americans, is being dropped from prime-time television after this season. The cancellation of ''Archie Bunker's Place,'' the successor to the original Bunker program, ''All in the Family,'' was disclosed yesterday when CBS Television announced its evening lineup for next fall. In its two forms, the show ran 13 seasons on network prime time.


''All In The Family'' became ''Archie Bunker's Place,'' still starring Carroll O'Connor, when the three other principals left the show: Jean Stapleton, who played Edith Bunker, Archie's flighty but loyal wife; Sally Struthers, who played Gloria, their daughter, and Rob Reiner, who played her husband, Mike Stivic, whose liberal leanings earned him Archie Bunker's contemptuous characterization as a ''Polack pinko meathead.''


Such language was new to American television when it was heard on ''All in the Family'' in January 1971. The show, created by Norman Lear, was based on a BBC Television hit called ''Till Death Do Us Part.'' Mr. Lear offered his show, first called ''Those Were the Days,'' to ABC-TV in 1968 and again in 1969. ABC turned it down. In 1970, he took it to CBS-TV, where executives loved it and bought it but the chairman, William S. Paley, hated it.


Mr. Paley reluctantly agreed to carry the controversial program, but only at 9:30 P.M. Tuesdays, when, if it failed, it would not destroy the rest of the CBS schedule for that night. Promotion was held to a minimum and, just before it was shown for the first time, on Jan. 21, 1971, an announcer told viewers: ''The program you are about to see is 'All In the Family.' It seeks to throw a humorous spotliight on our frailties, prejudices and concerns. By making them a source of laughter, we hope to show -in a mature fashion - just how absurd they are.''


By the seventh episode, the program had doubled its ratings, and by the next fall it was No. 1 in the ratings. Once established, ''All in the Family'' served as the vehicle through which television broke down an entire catalogue of broadcasting taboos. Among its themes over the years have been racism, sex, impotence, abortion, rape, homosexuality, menopause, alcoholism, manic-depressiveness, wifeswapping and venereal disease.


''The cancellation doesn't surprise me at all,'' Mr. O'Connor said yesterday. ''I was expecting this months ago. I feel like we're leaving on top. I knew some of the executives were not happy with the show, but that's nothing new. Some of them weren't happy when we went on the air.'' ''Archie Bunker's Place'' ended the current season 23d in the national ratings.






Along with ''Archie Bunker's Place,'' CBS is dropping all but one of the six new programs it introduced at the start of the 1982-83 season. ''Newhart,'' a comedy starring Bob Newhart, is the only one scheduled to return next season. Departing will be: ''Square Pegs,'' ''Bring 'Em Back Alive,'' ''Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,'' ''Tucker's Witch'' and ''Filthy Rich,'' which had proved to be a hit during the slow season last summer. Also canceled were ''Private Benjamin,'' and ''Cagney and Lacey.''


Five new shows will be introduced, including ''After M*A*S*H,'' a spinoff from the popular ''M*A*S*H.'' Also announced for the fall were another doctor show, ''Cutter to Houston,'' with Jim Metzler and Shelley Hack; ''Scarecrow and Mrs. King,'' a story of international intrigue, with Kate Jackson and Bruce Boxleitner; ''Navy,'' with Dennis Weaver, about a widower raising three daughters on a Navy post and ''Whiz Kids,'' an adventure-mystery show involving teen-age computer enthusiasts.


CBS said two series now being tried out also would be retained: ''Goodnight Beantown'' and ''The Mississippi.''




Here is Martin Balsam's Obituary from The New York Times


Martin Balsam Is Dead at 76; Ubiquitous Character Actor


By LAWRENCE VAN GELDER
Published: February 14, 1996



Martin Balsam, a heavyset, baldish character actor whose talents earned him an Oscar, a Tony and roles in scores of films and plays and hundreds of television shows over more than half a century, died yesterday in his hotel room in Rome while on vacation there. Mr. Balsam, who lived on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, was 76.


The cause was a stroke, his son, Adam, said.


As versatile and ubiquitous as he was, Mr. Balsam was philosophical on the subject of character actors. He often told a story about a woman who walked up to one of them and said: "Hey, I saw you. You played the detective who does that bit with the piano.'


Mr. Balsam continued: "Then she goes on to describe just about every small piece of action he did in every movie he's been in. Tremendous amount of enthusiasm, smiles, congratulations; she thinks he's great. Finally she asks his name. He tells her, and she says: 'What? I never heard of you,' and walks away. That's the way it is when you play character parts."


But people tended to remember Mr. Balsam.


In films, he made his debut in 1954 as an investigator in "On the Waterfront," and went on to play everyone from a juror in "Twelve Angry Men" (1957) to a doomed detective in "Psycho" (1960) to military officers in "Seven Days in May" (1964) and "Catch 22" (1970) to a newspaper editor in "All the President's Men" (1976). He was a patent medicine salesman in "Little Big Man" (1970), a criminal in "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" (1974), a police chief in "Cape Fear" (1962) and a judge in its 1991 remake. His portrayal of an earthy businessman in "A Thousand Clowns" in 1965 won him the Academy Award for best supporting actor.


On the stage, Mr. Balsam made his debut as a villain in 1935 in "Pot Boiler" and later appeared on Broadway in such productions as "Macbeth,"' "The Liar," "The Rose Tattoo," "Camino Real" and "Middle of the Night." And he appeared elsewhere as everyone from a gangster in "Detective Story" to Hickey in "The Iceman Cometh" and Willie Loman in "Death of a Salesman." He won his Tony for his three roles -- job-seeking actor, lovelorn husband, father -- in the 1967 Broadway production of "You Know I Can't Hear You When the Water's Running," four short plays by Robert Anderson.


In television, he appeared on hundreds of shows, from "Captain Video," portraying a Chinese peasant for $13 in 1948, to such monuments of the Golden Age as Philco Television Playhouse, Playhouse 90 and Studio One and later "Archie Bunker's Place" (1980), in which he played the bigoted Archie's Jewish partner in a saloon.


Born in the Bronx on Nov. 4, 1919, he was the son of Albert Balsam, a manufacturer of ladies' sportswear, and the former Lillian Weinstein.


He grew up on Mosholu Parkway and became involved in theater and music at DeWitt Clinton High School. He was a member of the drama club, took part in declamation contests, taught himself to play the piano and joined a group called Murray Levine and His Syncopated Five. "We played at weddings, bar mitzvahs, pizzerias, for $2.50 a weekend," he said.


Mr. Balsam also became a master of ceremonies at a vacation resort, where he later recalled forgetting the punch line of a story and being told by the owner he might be better off putting out the house newspaper.


Mr. Balsam acted in summer stock before World War II took him to the China-Burma-India theater of operations as a radioman in a B-24. On his return, he became one of the original members of the Actors Studio, working with Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan. In 1948 he appeared in the Studio's first public production, "Sundown Beach,"' directed by Mr. Kazan.


"I shared an apartment at $9 a month on 24th Street between First and Second Avenues with an outside john, and ate a lot of mashed potatoes," Mr. Balsam said. "I became an expert at shepherd's pie. And I learned to be a plumber, a painter, a repairman."


In those days, it was mainly television that paid for the potatoes. "I mean I was there early on: all those early live things, where you had notes on the table and read the script off the floor," he said.


Discussing his career in a 1970 interview, Mr. Balsam said he didn't like every script sent his way and didn't always feel like acting. But he added: "This is what I do. What I do best. I don't hate it. I like it. What am I supposed to do? Make a pile and retire at 50 and rent a trailer and go to Mexico? I don't ever want to retire."


Mr. Balsam's three marriages -- to Pearl L. Sommer, the actress Joyce Van Patten and Irene Miller -- ended in divorce. He is survived by a daughter, Talia, of Los Angeles, from his marriage to Ms. Van Patten; a son, Adam, of Los Angeles, and a daughter, Zoe, of Manhattan, from his marriage to Ms. Miller, and a brother, Warren, of Norwood, N.J.



Here is Allan Melvin's Obituary


Actor Allan Melvin dies at 84
TV thesp best known for 'Brady Bunch' role
By Associated Press

Allan Melvin, a character actor with countless credits best known for playing Sam the Butcher on “The Brady Bunch,” has died. He was 84.


Melvin died of cancer Thursday at his home in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles, said his wife of 64 years, Amalia Melvin.


The jowly, jovial Melvin spent decades playing a series of sidekicks, second bananas and lovable lugs, including Archie Bunker’s friend Barney Hefner on “All in the Family” and Sgt. Bilko’s right-hand man Cpl. Henshaw on “The Phil Silvers Show.”


But his place in pop culture will be fixed as butcher and bowler Sam Franklin, the love interest of Brady family maid Alice Nelson, played by Ann B. Davis. Melvin played the role from 1970-73.


Born in Kansas City, Mo., Melvin grew up in New York and attended Columbia U.


He was appearing on Broadway in “Stalag 17” when he began his decades-long television career with “The Phil Silvers Show,” playing a role his wife said was always his favorite.


He saw steady employment as a voice actor from the early 1960s to the early 1990s, most famously providing the voice of “Magilla Gorilla” for the Hanna Barbera cartoon of the same name.


In addition to Amalia, Melvin is survived by a daughter and a grandson. Another daughter died in 1970.



Here is Anne Meara's Obituary from Variety


Actress and Comedian Anne Meara, Mother of Ben Stiller, Dies at 85
May 24, 2015
By Carmel Dagan


Anne Meara, the Emmy- and Tony-nominated comedian long paired personally and professionally with Jerry Stiller and the mother of actor-director Ben Stiller, died Saturday, her husband and son told the Associated Press. She was 85.


No further details have been revealed. A statement released to the AP said Jerry Stiller was Meara’s “husband and partner in life.” The statement added, “The two were married for 61 years and worked together almost as long.”


Stiller and Meara were a top comedy act in the 1960s, appearing on “The Ed Sullivan Show” 36 times. The two were members of the improv group the Compass Players, which later became Second City.


Although Meara had converted to Judaism when the couple got married, Stiller & Meara’s material centered on the differences in their ethnic backgrounds, epitomized by their signature “Hershey Horowitz/Mary Elizabeth Doyle” routines.


In 2010 the couple had their own Yahoo comedy series, “Stiller & Meara,” produced in part by son Ben.


But Meara was also a serious dramatic actress who received a 1993 Tony nomination for featured actress in a play for her work in Eugene O’Neill’s “Anna Christie,” which starred Liam Neeson and Natasha Richardson. She also penned a couple of plays that made it to Off Broadway.


She was also well known for recurring on daytime soap “All My Children” from 1993-98 as Peggy Moody; for her work on “Archie Bunker’s Place,” for which she received two of her four Emmy nominations; and for her bravura performance as the indefatigable suburban mother in Greg Mottola’s 1997 indie “The Daytrippers.” In that film, Hope Davis plays a woman who can’t get her husband, who’s in Manhattan, on the phone, whereupon her mother, played by Meara, puts the suburban family in the station wagon to begin an antic search for him in the city.


Roger Ebert said: Meara is “almost by definition, superb at her assignment here, which is to create an insufferable mother. The film’s problem is that she does it so well.”


Also in 1997 Meara gave a memorable performance on the smallscreen, on a two-part episode of “Homicide: Life on the Street,” in which she played a schoolteacher in a tense hostage situation, drawing her fourth Emmy nomination.


In 1984 Meara shared a Writers Guild Award for penning the telepic “The Other Woman,” in which Hal Linden played a widower who toys with the notion of romance with his daughter’s sexy roommate but ultimately finds love with a woman played by Meara.


Meara appeared as two different characters on “The King of Queens,” where Stiller was a series regular from 1998-2007 as the much-married Arthur Spooner, the father of Leah Remini’s Carrie Heffernan. She played Mary Finnegan (the mother of Spence, played by Patton Oswalt); then she had a recurring role as Veronica, who married Stiller’s character in the final season of the series.


The actress recurred on “Sex and the City” as the mother of bartender Steve Brady and guested on “Will & Grace” in 2001.


“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” afforded Meara the opportunity to give two powerful guest performances. In 2004 she played the mother of a serial killer who, with anguish, helps the police apprehend her son before he can kill again; in a 2012 episode she played the mother of a prostitute (played by Patricia Arquette) who’s involved with an armed and dangerous man and then goes missing.


On HBO’s “Oz” Meara played the religious aunt of the imprisoned O’Reily brothers in episodes in 1999 and 2002.


Meara also had a long career in movies, often appearing with members of her family. Stiller and Meara starred in Joan Micklin Silver’s 1999 feature “A Fish in the Bathtub,” about a couple who have been bickering for decades, finally prompting the wife to move in with their son, played by Mark Ruffalo.


In Ben Stiller’s first feature directorial effort, 1994’s “Reality Bites,” Meara and her daughter Amy both had roles. In his 2001 comedy “Zoolander,” Meara and Amy had cameos, while Jerry played Zoolander’s manager and Ben’s wife Christine Taylor played a Time magazine reporter. Meara had a small role in the Shawn Levy-directed hit “Night at the Museum,” starring Ben.


Jerry was the star of 2000 mockumentary “The Independent,” in which he played Morty Fineman, a director of comically bizarre exploitation films with a message such as 1969’s “Groovy Hippie Slumber Party,” “Kent State Nurses” and — taking credit for the use of Roman numerals in film titles — war epic “World War III II.” Even in this low-profile, low-budget film, Ben Stiller, Amy Stiller and Meara supported the effort with cameos.


Similarly, in the much-earlier horror film “Highway to Hell” (1991), Jerry Stiller, Meara, as well as Ben and Amy, all had roles.


In 1998’s “Southie,” starring Donnie Wahlberg in the story of hoods in Boston’s famous working-class Irish neighborhood, Meara played the Wahlberg character’s ailing mother “with warm grit,” according to the Boston Phoenix.


Meara was born in Brooklyn to parents of Irish descent. She studied drama at HB Studio in Greenwich Village; decades later she would teach a course there herself. The young actress won an Obie for the 1955 Off Broadway production “Mädchen in Uniform.”


She made her Broadway debut in 1956 in a Michael Redgrave-directed production of Turgenev’s “A Month in the Country.” The same year she appeared in Brecht’s “The Good Woman of Setzuan” that also featured Jerry Stiller in a small role. In 1957 she appeared in the original drama “Miss Lonelyhearts.” In 1970, she co-starred in John Guare’s “The House of Blue Leaves” in New York. After a long absence, she returned to Broadway in 1988 in Richard Greenberg’s “Eastern Standard” before taking on “Anna Christie” in 1993.


Meara wrote and starred in the hit Off Broadway play “Afterplay” (1995), which also starred, at various times, Jerry Stiller, Rita Moreno, Rue McClanahan and Barbara Barrie. Meara also wrote “Down the Garden Paths,” which played Off Broadway in 2000 and starred Jerry Stiller, Amy Stiller and Eli Wallach.


In 2011 Meara and Conchata Farrell were brought in as replacements in an Off Broadway staging of “Love, Loss, and What I Wore,” the Nora and Delia Ephron play based on Ilene Beckerman’s book.


The actress made her screen debut in 1954 on NBC series “The Greatest Gift.” She also appeared on an Arthur Penn-directed “The Philco-Goodyear Television Playhouse” adaptation of Robert Alan Arthur’s “Man on the Mountaintop” and, in 1959, in an ABC adaptation of “Ninotchka” that starred Maria Schell.


In the brief 1964 animated series “Linus! The Lion Hearted,” Stiller & Meara were credited for three episodes. She appeared in a 1971 TV adaptation of the musical “Dames at Sea,” starring Ann-Margret.


Meara also starred in her own, brief NBC series, “Kate McShane,” in which she played an attorney who solves mysteries, in 1975 — drawing her first Emmy nomination, for lead actress in a drama.


She was a series regular on “Archie Bunker’s Place,” from 1979-82, as Veronica Rooney, the bar’s wisecracking, alcoholic chef — picking up her second and third Emmy nominations, for supporting actress in a comedy, in 1981 and 1982.


She recurred on the brief ABC series “The Corner Bar” in 1972-73 as well as on “Rhoda” as one of the title character’s friends, Sally Gallagher or “Big Sally,” a divorced flight attendant. (Jerry Stiller appeared on one episode as her ex.) Later, in 1987-89, she recurred on NBC’s “ALF” as the mother of series star Anne Schedeen’s character.


Meara was also busy in the 1970s guesting on the likes of “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” “The Paul Lynde Show,” “Love, American Style” and Medical Center.”


The couple shot (and penned) a pilot, “The Stiller & Meara Show,” in 1986, but it was not picked up to series.


Meara’s early feature work included roles in Arthur Hiller’s adaptation of Neil Simon’s “The Out of Towners” and Joseph Bologna and Renee Taylor’s adaptation of their own play “Lovers and Other Strangers,” both in 1970; in 1977’s Nasty Habits,” a satire of Watergate applied to the politics of a convent, both Meara and Stiller appeared, with the New York Times applauding Meara’s efforts as the “Gerald Ford of Crewe Abbey.” She had a small role in 1978 thriller “The Boys From Brazil,” starring Laurence Olivier and Gregory Peck, and in 1980’s “Fame,” the actress played Mrs. Sherwood, the teacher concerned with the students’ traditional academic progress.


Meara appeared in the Paul Bartel-directed, Tim Conway-scripted 1986 comedy “The Longshot.” She played one of Robin Williams’ patients in 1990’s “Awakenings.”


In 1999 Comedy Central aired a Friars’ Club Roast of Jerry Stiller, with Roasters drawn from several generations including Meara and son Ben.


Stiller and Meara shared a star on the Hollywood Walk in Fame, awarded in 2007.


In addition to son Ben and his wife, actress Christine Taylor, as well as daughter Amy, survivors include Jerry, whom Meara married in 1954, and grandchildren.



To read some articles about Archie Bunker's Place go to http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=mhQyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=dqQFAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=1994%2C2609054 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=ryIfAAAAIBAJ&sjid=cacEAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=1474%2C5453561 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=IlE0AAAAIBAJ&sjid=b7kFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1246%2C267821 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=JgcgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=4WQFAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=2668%2C940007 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=6xJGAAAAIBAJ&sjid=KNEMAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=3361%2C4648394 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=XN1eAAAAIBAJ&sjid=ilMNAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=1241%2C4841895 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=sUQaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=wSQEAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=5382%2C4159170 and http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=jwItAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Qc8FAAAAIBAJ&dq=archie%20bunker's%20place&pg=932%2C539944


To watch some clips from Archie Bunker's Place gto to http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=archie+bunker%27s+place&aq=f


For the Archie Bunker's Place Homepage go to https://web.archive.org/web/20060103111627/http://archiebunkersplace.netfirms.com/


To see how AITF and ABP were related go to http://www.poobala.com/allandarchie.html


For more on Carroll O'Connor go to http://www.museum.tv/eotv/oconnorcar.htm


For some Archie Bunker's Place-related interview videos at the Archive of American Television go to https://interviews.televisionacademy.com/shows/archie-bunkers-place
Date: Sun November 2, 2008 � Filesize: 41.9kb � Dimensions: 382 x 400 �
Keywords: Archie Bunker's Place Cast (Links Updated 7/14/18)

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