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dilbertast

Poster: Mr. Television  (see this users gallery)

Dilbert ran from January 1999 until August 2000 on UPN.


While Fred Savage, the innocent Kevin of The Wonder Years, went on to star in one wild parody of corporate America ( Working), his alter-ego ( Daniel Stern)provided the lead voice on another. Dilbert ( Stern), was an everyman for modern office workers, coping with the absurdities and frustrations of a Beurocracy gone mad. The Company for which he worked as a lowly , cubicle-bound engineer, was giganic and totally dysfunctional. At one point it marketed a throat lozenge laced with anthrax spores and when that failed, planned another product called " Salmonella" When layoffs took place there was actual rioting in the offices. Lazy Wally( Gordon Hunt), and hyperactive aggressive (Alice( Cathy Griffin), were fellow engineers. They all worked for the boss ( Larry Miller), a pointy-haired incompetent who took credit for the work of others and was totally insensitive to the needs of his people. Since the Company only cared about profits, Dilbert's work was closely scrutinized by the dreaded marketing department, and he was constantly under pressure to come up with new products and ideas. The ultimate threat should he fil to produce, was a transfer to Albany, the Siberia of the Company. Dilbert's most beloved invention was the Gruntmaster 6000, whose purpose was never explained-although his supperiors had great hopes for it's success. Dogbert ( Chris Elliott), was Dilbert's sarcastic canine roommate, an opportunist and master manipulator who turned every situation into a profitable business opportunity for himself. In one episode he even orchestrated a takeover of the Company and installed himself as CEO. Dilmom ( Jackie Hoffman), Dilbert's condescending mother came to visit occasionally, invariably beating him at Scrabble.


In the series ending two-parter, Dilbert sent a small rocket probe to find samples of life and return to him. It accumilated DNA from aliens, a hillbilly, a cow,an engineer and a robot. When it returned, it struck Dilbert in the buttocks and impregnated him. Because the Company had cut back on his health insurance and wouldn't cover his pregnancy, he went to a literary agent, who manipulated the media into a frenzy. At the televised custody hearing for his unborn " baby" presided over by Judge " Stone Cold" Steve Austin, Dilbert lost custody, attempted suicide by jumping out the courtroom window , and was saved by Dogbert. After Dilbert gave birth to a hybrid baby, Dogbert kept it out of the hands of the people by sending it to Jor-El and Lara on the planet-Krypton-which apparantly had not been destroyed after they had sent their infant son to Earth decades later.


Based on the highly successful syndicated comic strip by Scot Adams, who also created the tv series.


What the critics say


New 'Dilbert' show praised and panned in print reviews
By David Astor
Publication: Editor & Publisher
Date: Saturday, January 30 1999


TV critics call the UPN series everything from
'a chuckle-filled blast'
to 'blandly written'


The new Dilbert television series is a work of art or a work in progress.
So sayeth reviews of the program's premiere episode on Jan. 25. Some TV writers loved the UPN show, while others felt Scott Adams' United Media

creation should have remained in its comics page cubicle. Here's a sampling of newspaper opinion:
Arkansas Democrat-Gazette's Michael Storey: "Monday's pilot episode, in which Dilbert had to come up with the name for a new company product, was a hoot."
Austin American Statesman's Diane Holloway: "UPN hopes Dilbert will do for it what The Simpsons did for Fox. And that just might happen."
Baltimore Sun's David Zurawik: "Dilbert is a smart series from a network that has seemed decidedly short on brainpower lately. But it should also be noted that Dilbert is fairly mainstream and middle-of-the-road in look and tone. The core audience for animation tends to be younger and more interested in subject matter with an edge."
Chicago Sun-Times' Phil Rosenthal: "Adams' droll three-lines-and-out humor loses all its subtlety here. The truth is, there already is a successful version of 'Dilbert' on the air: ABC's The Drew Carey Show. "
Chicago Tribune's Steve Johnson: "Even though it is intermittently quite funny, Dilbert is still a touch flat and a few notches too unlikely to be effective satire."
Colorado Springs Gazette's Katie Johnston: "The half-hour TV show promises to be even wackier than its printed version. Meetings end in nudity, souls of ex-employees are kept in jars, budget cuts inspire looting and gunfire."
Dallas Morning News' Ed Bark: "The hollowed-out denizens of Dilbert are best tolerated in three-panel doses on newspaper funny pages. Give 'em a whole half-hour and they quickly wear thin. Even the profane kids of South Park have more character than these soulless corporate clods."
Long Island, N.Y., Newsday's Marvin Kitman: "Dilbert is cool. [It] has a marvelously written, witty script by Larry Charles (Mad About You the good early years and Seinfeld) and strip creator Scott Adams."
Los Angeles Times' Howard Rosenberg: "Prime time's Dilbert affirms that the slender baton of cutting-edge sitcomedy has been passed to animation."
New York Post's Michele Greppi: "Daniel Stern supplies the voice of Dilbert, the lump-headed, spud-bodied Every Employee who knows there's got to be a better way to spend his days and nights. [But] Dogbert is the breakout character. A real scenery chewer."
The New York Times' Caryn James: "Though the show begins as a reflection of reality, its comic appeal is that it swiftly moves into the realm of lunacy and catharsis, with the characters saying and doing what all put-upon workers wish they could."
Newark, N.J., Star-Ledger's Alan Sepinwall: "Did I laugh at Dilbert? Yes, but not often enough to come back every week."
Orange County Register's Kinney Littlefield: "'Dilbert' addicts may find true nerdvana to use Adams' term in this prime-time saga of senseless workday drudgery and the inventive imbecility with which we struggle to fight back. But I'd rather cozy up to Law & Order reruns on A&E or X-Files encores on the F/X channel."
Portland Oregonian's Pete Schulberg: "Dilbert the series makes workplace nonsense a chuckle-filled blast. If you like the strip, you'll like the TV version. The trademark sarcasm that cartoonist Scott Adams brings to newspaper readers each day transfers surprisingly smoothly to TV."
Salt Lake City Deseret News' Scott Pierce: "Not that Dilbert is a bad show it's OK, with some funny moments in Monday's premiere. But it's not a distinctive, groundbreaking show like The Simpsons."
San Francisco Chronicle's John Carman: "Dilbert brings a solid brand name to UPN and TV animation. If only it brought the laughs along, too. [It's] blandly written and visually uninteresting."
USA Today's Robert Bianco: "Dilbert passes a fan's first test: It accurately captures the look and tone of the strip. Like the strip, Dilbert scores best with quick, nasty jokes that give you that buzz of worker-bee recognition."
The Washington Post's Tom Shales: "Dilbert scores partly because it specializes. It concentrates. It's a workplace comedy. It's smart and savvy and achingly funny, so that you may laugh even as you wince. UPN has got itself a wincer oh, and a winner, too."
Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal's Tim Clodfelter: "Like the comic strip, the animated Dilbert works best when it focuses on the workplace. The scenes in Dilbert's home vary from uneven to unwatchable. When it works, Dilbert can be hilarious, with biting humor that no live-action series could get away with." Chicago Sun-Times' Phil Rosenthal: "Adams' droll three-lines-and-out humor loses all its subtlety here. The truth is, there already is a successful version of 'Dilbert' on the air: ABC's The Drew Carey Show. "
Chicago Tribune's Steve Johnson: "Even though it is intermittently quite funny, Dilbert is still a touch flat and a few notches too unlikely to be effective satire."
Colorado Springs Gazette's Katie Johnston: "The half-hour TV show promises to be even wackier than its printed version. Meetings end in nudity, souls of ex-employees are kept in jars, budget cuts inspire looting and gunfire."
Dallas Morning News' Ed Bark: "The hollowed-out denizens of Dilbert are best tolerated in three-panel doses on newspaper funny pages. Give 'em a whole half-hour and they quickly wear thin. Even the profane kids of South Park have more character than these soulless corporate clods."
Long Island, N.Y., Newsday's Marvin Kitman: "Dilbert is cool. [It] has a marvelously written, witty script by Larry Charles (Mad About You the good early years and Seinfeld) and strip creator Scott Adams."
Los Angeles Times' Howard Rosenberg: "Prime time's Dilbert affirms that the slender baton of cutting-edge sitcomedy has been passed to animation."
New York Post's Michele Greppi: "Daniel Stern supplies the voice of Dilbert, the lump-headed, spud-bodied Every Employee who knows there's got to be a better way to spend his days and nights. [But] Dogbert is the breakout character. A real scenery chewer."
The New York Times' Caryn James: "Though the show begins as a reflection of reality, its comic appeal is that it swiftly moves into the realm of lunacy and catharsis, with the characters saying and doing what all put-upon workers wish they could."
Newark, N.J., Star-Ledger's Alan Sepinwall: "Did I laugh at Dilbert? Yes, but not often enough to come back every week."
Orange County Register's Kinney Littlefield: "'Dilbert' addicts may find true nerdvana to use Adams' term in this prime-time saga of senseless workday drudgery and the inventive imbecility with which we struggle to fight back. But I'd rather cozy up to Law & Order reruns on A&E or X-Files encores on the F/X channel."
Portland Oregonian's Pete Schulberg: "Dilbert the series makes workplace nonsense a chuckle-filled blast. If you like the strip, you'll like the TV version. The trademark sarcasm that cartoonist Scott Adams brings to newspaper readers each day transfers surprisingly smoothly to TV."
Salt Lake City Deseret News' Scott Pierce: "Not that Dilbert is a bad show it's OK, with some funny moments in Monday's premiere. But it's not a distinctive, groundbreaking show like The Simpsons."
San Francisco Chronicle's John Carman: "Dilbert brings a solid brand name to UPN and TV animation. If only it brought the laughs along, too. [It's] blandly written and visually uninteresting."
USA Today's Robert Bianco: "Dilbert passes a fan's first test: It accurately captures the look and tone of the strip. Like the strip, Dilbert scores best with quick, nasty jokes that give you that buzz of worker-bee recognition."
The Washington Post's Tom Shales: "Dilbert scores partly because it specializes. It concentrates. It's a workplace comedy. It's smart and savvy and achingly funny, so that you may laugh even as you wince. UPN has got itself a wincer oh, and a winner, too."
Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal's Tim Clodfelter: "Like the comic strip, the animated Dilbert works best when it focuses on the workplace. The scenes in Dilbert's home vary from uneven to unwatchable. When it works, Dilbert can be hilarious, with biting humor that no live-action


To watch some clips from Dilbert go to http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=dilbert+tv+show&aq=f


To watch the opening credits go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hk0ujsHLPMM
Date: Tue July 11, 2006 � Filesize: 30.1kb � Dimensions: 314 x 450 �
Keywords: Dilbert

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