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Florence Henderson, Upbeat Mom of The Brady Bunch, Dies at 82 (NYT)


By ANITA GATES NOV. 25, 2016




Florence Henderson, who began her career as an ingenue soprano in stage musicals in the 1950s but made a more lasting impression on television as the perky 1970s sitcom mom on The Brady Bunch, died on Thursday in Los Angeles. She was 82.


Her death was confirmed by David Brokaw, her publicist. He said that she died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and that her family said the cause was heart failure.


She was quite active until she started not feeling well several days ago, Mr. Brokaw said. It was felt that she would just bounce back from it.


Ms. Henderson was making a film in Norway in 1969 when she was asked to appear in the pilot episode of The Brady Bunch, an unapologetically upbeat comedy about a woman with three daughters who meets, marries and makes a sunny suburban California home with a widower who has three sons.




The series ran from September 1969 to March 1974, attracting viewers during a period of extreme social change and the Vietnam War, neither of which touched the Bradys world.


The show took on new life in syndication. In the end, it spawned television movies and reunion specials, short-lived spinoffs (including The Brady Bunch Variety Hour in the mid- 70s) and eventually two feature films.


Ms. Henderson defended the original television show from its detractors, who ridiculed it for its simplistic, impossibly wholesome plots and its idealized portrait of family life. It was really a show that was seen through the eyes of a child, she said, and it was supposed to have a little soft glow about it.



The question of whether Carol Brady was widowed or divorced was never definitively established on the television show. In A Very Brady Sequel (1996), the second of the two movies based on the show, a character (who turns out to be an impostor) claims to be her long-lost husband, who was thought to have died at sea.


Ms. Henderson pretended to clear up the mystery in a 2015 interview. I killed my husband, she announced. I was the original Black Widow. Nobody ever said, but I always say I just got rid of him.


Before the series, Ms. Henderson had built an impressive reputation with stage work. She starred in Fanny on Broadway in the mid-1950s, when she was in her early 20s; The King and I at the Los Angeles Music Center; South Pacific at Lincoln Center; national tours of Oklahoma! and The Sound of Music ; and The Girl Who Came to Supper (1963), Noel Coward's last original Broadway musical.


Theater roles led her to television in its early days, mostly as a singer. In the 1950s and 60s she appeared on music-driven series like The Bell Telephone Hour, Oldsmobile Music Theater and The Dean Martin Show. She also appeared on a 1958 audience participation series, Sing Along, and game shows like The Match Game and Password.


She was a frequent guest on The Tonight Show during both Jack Paar's and Johnny Carson's eras as host. And in 1962, after Paar left and before Carson arrived, she became the first woman to be the show's guest host.


NBC's venerable morning news and entertainment series Today was a part of her career twice. From 1959 to 1960, she was the so-called Today Girl, doing fashion stories and other light-news segments. Four decades later, she was a co-host of an offshoot, Later Today, but that series lasted less than a year.


Florence Agnes Henderson was born on Feb. 14, 1934, the youngest of Joseph and Elizabeth Henderson's 10 children, in Dale, Ind., near the Kentucky border. Her father was a sharecropper, and the family struggled financially. Ms. Henderson recalled working from the age of 8, babysitting and cleaning other people's homes, and sometimes singing a folk or country song in exchange for groceries.



She had a strict Roman Catholic upbringing and was sent to St. Frances Academy in Owensboro, Ky., for her high school education. There, the Benedictine nuns taught her to sing Latin Masses and Gregorian chants.


By the time she graduated, she had been befriended by two important people in her life: Christine Johnson, a former Broadway actress who suggested that Ms. Henderson study acting as well as singing, and the affluent father of a school friend who helped her get to New York.


She lived at the Three Arts Club, an Upper West Side women's hotel, and studied at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts for a year before being cast, in 1952, in Wish You Were Here, a musical comedy about a summer camp for grown-ups.

The show was a hit, but Ms. Henderson left early when she was cast as the female lead, Laurey, in the national tour of Oklahoma! The movie role went to Shirley Jones, but Ms. Henderson's theater and television careers took off from there. (Ms. Jones, as it happened, turned up as a sitcom mom with five children on The Partridge Family at the same time the Bradys were on the air.)





By 1974, when The Brady Bunch ended its run, prime-time television had changed. With few if any music or variety programs on the schedule, Ms. Henderson turned to guest appearances on a wide range of series, including Medical Center, Ally McBeal, Happily Divorced and 30 Rock. She made multiple appearances on The Love Boat and Fantasy Island, both of which featured guest-star ensembles, and in television movies.


She was host of Country Kitchen, a cooking show on TNN, for nine years beginning in 1985. When prime time entered its reality-series phase, she found a place on My Fair Brady, which followed the romantic relationship of Christopher Knight, the former Brady Bunch son Peter Brady, and his girlfriend, the model Adrianne Curry. In 2006 Ms. Henderson was a font of maternal wisdom on the sixth and final season of the reality series The Surreal Life, which recorded a group of aging celebrities living together for a time in a Hollywood mansion.


And in 2010 she appeared on Dancing With the Stars as the partner of a professional ballroom dancer, Corky Ballas. (The couple were eliminated in the competition after performing a tango to the Brady Bunch theme.)



On Monday, Ms. Henderson was spotted in the show's studio audience to support a contestant, the actress Maureen McCormick, who had played Marcia in The Brady Bunch.


Ms. Henderson also appeared in television commercials for decades and refused to apologize for doing them, referring to the form as a serious acting challenge.


After a bad beginning in Song of Norway (1970), a poorly received musical biography of the composer Edvard Grieg, Ms. Henderson made few feature films. Her later movies, like Bobcat Goldthwait's Shakes the Clown (1997), in which she played an unnamed woman who has a one-night stand with the title character, and For Heaven's Sake (2008), in which she played a grandmother who dies on a roller coaster, did nothing to advance that side of her career. On the other hand, her appearance as part of the superstar ensemble cast of the 2007 television special Broadway: Beyond the Golden Age reminded audiences of both her stage and television skills.


She married Ira Bernstein, a Broadway casting director and general manager, in 1956, when she was starring in Fanny. They had four children before divorcing in 1985. In 1987, she married Dr. John Kappas. He died in 2002.


She is survived by two daughters, Barbara and Elizabeth; two sons, Joseph and Robert; and five grandchildren.


Ms. Henderson was asked in a 1999 Archive of American Television interview how she would like to be remembered. She answered, Probably as someone who survived for a long time in a very tough business and, hopefully, managed to retain a sense of humanity.
Date: Sun November 27, 2016 � Filesize: 35.0kb, 46.4kbDimensions: 676 x 870 �
Keywords: Florence Henderson

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