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Old 01-25-2017, 06:22 PM   #16
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Cloris Leachman

http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/...achman-tribute

“My heart goes out to her husband, Robert,” Leachman wrote, continuing, “he was never more than a touch away from her. The picture that we all have of her, that’s how she was—sweet, kind, so tender, so delicate. She was America’s sweetheart. Valerie [Harper] and I always had to rehearse and rehearse to work things through, but Mary was always ready to go, thoroughly prepared. The last time I saw her was our Hot In Cleveland reunion. I had a feeling I wouldn’t see her again. If I could see her one last time, I’d hold her in my arms and say, We loved you.”
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Old 01-25-2017, 06:33 PM   #17
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Rest in peace.
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Old 01-25-2017, 06:56 PM   #18
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I know she had health issues and she was 80, but it's still a shock. She was truly a tv icon who starred in 2 of most beloved sitcoms of all time by the age of 40 which is quite an achievement. Seems like we've lost a lot of celebrities last year and this year isn't looking too good either. R.I.P. Mary.
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Old 01-25-2017, 07:32 PM   #19
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Awful and shocking news. May she rest peacefully.
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Old 01-25-2017, 07:44 PM   #20
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http://deadline.com/2017/01/mary-tyl...ay-1201894305/

CBS To Honor Mary Tyler Moore With Primetime Special Thursday
by Lisa de Moraes
January 25, 2017 3:28pm



UPDATED with rebroadcast of PBS documentary: CBS said this afternoon it will air a special one-hour CBS News tribute to Mary Tyler Moore, who died today at 80.



Gayle King will anchor Mary Tyler Moore: Love Is All Around, to air at 9 PM ET. And yes, Oprah Winfrey will be among those who weigh in, though she was not involved in any of Moore’s iconic TV series and there are still plenty of people around who were. Some of those presumably will participate in the special, though CBS News did not name any of them.

PBS, on the other hand, said its stations will rebroadcast Mary Tyler Moore: A Celebration in honor of the TV icon. The documentary, which first aired in 2015, commemorates Moore and her 50-plus-year career,and features names such as Dick Van Dyke, Betty White, and Valerie Harper, who actually were involved in Moore’s life and work. Check local PBS stations for details.

CBS took guff in some quarters today when it briefly interrupted its daytime schedule for Scott Pelley to report that Moore had died. Moore was a huge CBS star, including her roles as Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show in the 1960s, and as the single woman with a career in TV journalism on The Mary Tyler Moore Show in the ’70s.

CBS News said the special will “mine CBS’ vast archives ” and include “interviews with Oprah Winfrey, newsmakers, admirers and others.”

Susan Zirinsky is the senior executive producer of the CBS special.
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Old 01-25-2017, 08:03 PM   #21
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Someone posted here a few months ago that she was in grave condition so this was not a surprise. What a contrast it is with the classy stars of what is now the golden age of television with the smarmy crap there is today. I might start to watch the CBS special but I doubt it will do her justice. That smile that turned the world on will never dim for those of us that grew up watching her.
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Old 01-25-2017, 08:31 PM   #22
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I remember watching the Mary Tyler Moore show when I was a kid.
I actually did not understand a lot of the plots because the dialogue was more for grown ups to understand . Back then I did not know anything about it being a "groundbreaking" sitcom featuring a single woman who works rather than a married mother who stays home. It seemed to nevertheless depict the main character as a typical female in certain ways.
I loved the theme song. It sounded like the kind of song that is just meant to be nostalgic .
I am sorry to hear that Mary Tyler Moore died , but I heard she was struggling with health issues.
I also heard long ago that her son killed himself.
Mary Tyler Moore's most known role became a most iconic one in TV history as did the theme song and the very last scene of the opening tune in which she throws her hat up in the air.
It seems that no other TV character left such a lasting image.

RIP Mary Tyler Moore. You brought joy into a lot of people's lives.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:11 PM   #23
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Default Excellent observations about how MTM transformed TV.

http://www.vulture.com/2017/01/mary-...t-auteurs.html

Quote:
Mary Tyler Moore was a cultural giant who carried herself with a dancer’s grace. She died today at 80, leaving behind a transformed TV landscape, more hospitable to wry, subtle character comedy and more respectful of the emotional lives of women. In a medium still dominated by men, covered by a press corps that still seems inclined to look for the next brooding and obsessive male auteur, we shouldn’t forget that Moore was an auteur herself, and one of the most important in TV history. Her acting career blazed new trails for women in the entertainment industry, and her work as a producer helped popularize TV sitcoms and dramas that weren’t plot- or even gag-driven, but built around characters’ emotions and needs. The astonishing evolution of scripted television in the last 20 years was preceded by the work of figures like Moore. When her most famous character, Mary Richards, tossed her hat in the air in the opening credits of The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970–77), the medium instantly warmed to her sunbeam smile; over the next decade and beyond, her example liberated television in ways that it has only begun to understand.

Moore’s landmark star vehicle was preceded by her stint on The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–66), a sitcom set against the world of New York comedy programming. She played Laura Petrie, the goofy yet supremely elegant wife of Van Dyke’s comedy writer Rob Petrie. On both that series and The Mary Tyler Moore Show, set at a Minneapolis news station, Moore presented audiences with a new female image: the kindhearted but resilient urban sophisticate, smart and sexy and funny, slightly neurotic and a bit of a kook. We take that type for granted now — 30 Rock’s Liz Lemon has her own peculiarities, but functionally she’s Mary Richards running Saturday Night Live — but it felt bracingly new at a time (the 1960s and ’70s) when sitcoms tended to define female leads as girlfriends, wives, or mothers first.

Her chemistry with Van Dyke was so extraordinary that it ruled out any possibility of the show turning into a more urbane riff on I Love Lucy, a great sitcom in its own right, but one often predicated on making its star and co-executive producer, Lucille Ball, into the butt of jokes as her character, homemaker Lucy Ricardo, tried to wheedle into her bandleader husband’s glamorous showbiz life. The Petries, in contrast, were equals in every way except financially. And the show’s creator, writer-actor Carl Reiner, kept contriving reasons to have them do comedy routines and dance numbers together, because every time they did it they killed. Reiner and the show’s writers made The Dick Van Dyke Show’s good-looking, slender stars into a power couple who never would have thought of themselves that way because they were oblivious to their own charm. With their urban, liberal WASP glamour, the Petries were comedy mirrors of John and Jackie Kennedy, as well as a harbinger of the lovable chatterbox yuppies who would start to dominate sitcoms in the '80s.


Moore’s follow-up to The Dick Van Dyke Show was ultimately more important because it broke so much more ground. While it distributed its attention democratically among associate news producer Mary Richards (Moore) and her co-workers, and fashioned Moore’s character as the reactive center of a storm of eccentricity, it was unabashedly a star vehicle that put its top-billed actress front and center, just as The Dick Van Dyke Show had with its namesake. Overseen by writer-producer James L. Brooks, who would become a legendary figure in his own right, it was also the first major sitcom to revolve around a single professional woman who wasn’t widowed. Moore originally wanted Mary to be divorced, but network TV circa 1971 wasn’t ready to do that with a lead character, so the writers gave her a backstory that found her moving to Minneapolis after getting dumped by a boyfriend she’d helped put through medical school. Over seven seasons, the show gave Mary a series of boyfriends, all likable if a tad odd, but ultimately not quite right for her (a stray line in one episode implied that she was on the pill).

But while Mary’s love life was a source of humor, it was ultimately of less interest to the series than the heroine’s work life, which saw her navigating a cranky, hard-drinking boss (Ed Asner’s Lou Grant, who eventually got his own CBS spinoff) and various oddball guest stars and office mates (including Ted Knight’s pompous, thickheaded newscaster Ted Baxter and Gavin MacLeod’s sardonic news writer Murray Slaughter) while trying to put on a popular local newscast of minimal integrity. One of The Mary Tyler Moore Show’s staunchest champions in CBS’s executive suite was Ethel Winant, one the few powerful women in TV in the ’60s and ’70s; she liked to tell the story about how, when she first started working at the network, there were no women’s executive bathrooms, so she had to use men’s bathroom and leave her shoes outside the door as a warning. Moore was a pioneer in that spirit, determined not just to carve out a place for herself, but fortify and sustain it.

To that end, The Mary Tyler Moore show established Moore as one of the most influential independent producers in network TV. She and her business partner and husband, future NBC president Grant Tinker, founded MTM in 1969, and turned their first effort, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, into a multiple Emmy-winning ratings hit. The company went on to air The Bob Newhart Show, Rhoda, and Lou Grant (both spinoffs of The Mary Tyler Moore Show), The White Shadow, WKRP in Cincinnati, Hill Street Blues, Remington Steele, and St. Elsewhere.

Moore’s second most significant production after her self-named sitcom might be Hill Street Blues — an NBC police drama from future TV megaproducer Steven Bochco (and often written by future Deadwood creator David Milch) that fused tropes from the police procedural, the daytime soap opera, and the town Western, creating a show so blackly comic, unabashedly earthy, frankly sexual, and fundamentally adult in its worldview that it held almost zero appeal for kids. A great many cable dramas in the so-called “prestige” mode owe their existence to Hill Street, as well as to the hilarious and often-surreal hospital soap St. Elsewhere. Although their once-groundbreaking production techniques now seem like pokey classicism, their dry wit, empathy, and rigorous intelligence still shine through. You could say the same of sitcoms made by graduates of the MTM factory: Brooks, in particular, carried on in that tradition for decades, on everything from Taxi and The Simpsons to feature films like Terms of Endearment and As Good As It Gets (all of which were sometimes denigrated by critics as big-screen television comedies).

MTM’s logo was a self-deprecating parody of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) logo, its proudly roaring lion replaced by Mary Tyler Moore’s meowing kitten, Mimsie. The logo changed depending on the series: The kitten at the end of The Bob Newhart Show said “meow” in Newhart’s voice, the one at the end of Hill Street Blues sported a little patrolman’s cap, and the one at the end of WKRP spun on a record player. When Mimsie died in 1988 at age 20, right before the final season of St. Elsewhere, the logo showed a still-framed image of Mimsie sleeping while an EKG pattern beeped. MTM’s cat logo summed up the company’s view of what television could be: a more intimate, inwardly directed cousin of cinema, not a direct competitor. This is an aspect of Moore’s legacy that I hope doesn’t get lost in the rush to talk about her likability and versatility onscreen. If you look at all the work that she put her name on as a producer, and all the careers that she helped nurture with and without Tinker (who left MTM after he and Moore divorced and he was named head of NBC), she followed in the footsteps of one her own role models, Lucille Ball, who co-founded Desilu with her co-star and husband Desi Arnaz and shepherded many legendary series, including The Andy Griffith Show, Star Trek, and Mission: Impossible, onto television.

But Mary Tyler Moore the performer will always be the first thing we think of. She was an expert farcical comic, screwball heroine, hoofer, and pratfaller (her “Raaahhhhhhb!” on The Dick Van Dyke Show is a worthy successor to Lucille Ball’s “Rick-EEEEEEEE!”). There was often a sense that Moore’s characters (Mary more than the others) lived life at a very slight remove from everyone around her, and were more thoughtful and watchful than the rest, though perhaps less naturally happy. Robert Redford cannily recognized the dark side of such a personality when he cast her as the withholding mother in Ordinary People who can’t connect with anyone, even her own son — a role for which Moore received an Academy Award nomination and stunned people who thought of her mainly as a comic performer. (You were only surprised if you hadn’t seen her 1978 TV movie First, You Cry, about a newscaster whose mastectomy changes her life.) Moore never seemed to be demanding that you look at her, but you could not take your eyes off her. She somehow managed to hold the screen while surrounded by characters that outshone her in energy and strangeness (a configuration Moore herself approved as producer), and yet that same faintly reticent, measured quality also suggested an inner strength, a rocklike solidity confirmed by Moore’s lifelong success at defining her image and career on her terms.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:11 PM   #24
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Default Excellent observations about how MTM transformed TV.

http://www.vulture.com/2017/01/mary-...t-auteurs.html

Quote:
Mary Tyler Moore was a cultural giant who carried herself with a dancer’s grace. She died today at 80, leaving behind a transformed TV landscape, more hospitable to wry, subtle character comedy and more respectful of the emotional lives of women. In a medium still dominated by men, covered by a press corps that still seems inclined to look for the next brooding and obsessive male auteur, we shouldn’t forget that Moore was an auteur herself, and one of the most important in TV history. Her acting career blazed new trails for women in the entertainment industry, and her work as a producer helped popularize TV sitcoms and dramas that weren’t plot- or even gag-driven, but built around characters’ emotions and needs. The astonishing evolution of scripted television in the last 20 years was preceded by the work of figures like Moore. When her most famous character, Mary Richards, tossed her hat in the air in the opening credits of The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970–77), the medium instantly warmed to her sunbeam smile; over the next decade and beyond, her example liberated television in ways that it has only begun to understand.

Moore’s landmark star vehicle was preceded by her stint on The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–66), a sitcom set against the world of New York comedy programming. She played Laura Petrie, the goofy yet supremely elegant wife of Van Dyke’s comedy writer Rob Petrie. On both that series and The Mary Tyler Moore Show, set at a Minneapolis news station, Moore presented audiences with a new female image: the kindhearted but resilient urban sophisticate, smart and sexy and funny, slightly neurotic and a bit of a kook. We take that type for granted now — 30 Rock’s Liz Lemon has her own peculiarities, but functionally she’s Mary Richards running Saturday Night Live — but it felt bracingly new at a time (the 1960s and ’70s) when sitcoms tended to define female leads as girlfriends, wives, or mothers first.

Her chemistry with Van Dyke was so extraordinary that it ruled out any possibility of the show turning into a more urbane riff on I Love Lucy, a great sitcom in its own right, but one often predicated on making its star and co-executive producer, Lucille Ball, into the butt of jokes as her character, homemaker Lucy Ricardo, tried to wheedle into her bandleader husband’s glamorous showbiz life. The Petries, in contrast, were equals in every way except financially. And the show’s creator, writer-actor Carl Reiner, kept contriving reasons to have them do comedy routines and dance numbers together, because every time they did it they killed. Reiner and the show’s writers made The Dick Van Dyke Show’s good-looking, slender stars into a power couple who never would have thought of themselves that way because they were oblivious to their own charm. With their urban, liberal WASP glamour, the Petries were comedy mirrors of John and Jackie Kennedy, as well as a harbinger of the lovable chatterbox yuppies who would start to dominate sitcoms in the '80s.

Moore’s follow-up to The Dick Van Dyke Show was ultimately more important because it broke so much more ground. While it distributed its attention democratically among associate news producer Mary Richards (Moore) and her co-workers, and fashioned Moore’s character as the reactive center of a storm of eccentricity, it was unabashedly a star vehicle that put its top-billed actress front and center, just as The Dick Van Dyke Show had with its namesake. Overseen by writer-producer James L. Brooks, who would become a legendary figure in his own right, it was also the first major sitcom to revolve around a single professional woman who wasn’t widowed. Moore originally wanted Mary to be divorced, but network TV circa 1971 wasn’t ready to do that with a lead character, so the writers gave her a backstory that found her moving to Minneapolis after getting dumped by a boyfriend she’d helped put through medical school. Over seven seasons, the show gave Mary a series of boyfriends, all likable if a tad odd, but ultimately not quite right for her (a stray line in one episode implied that she was on the pill).

But while Mary’s love life was a source of humor, it was ultimately of less interest to the series than the heroine’s work life, which saw her navigating a cranky, hard-drinking boss (Ed Asner’s Lou Grant, who eventually got his own CBS spinoff) and various oddball guest stars and office mates (including Ted Knight’s pompous, thickheaded newscaster Ted Baxter and Gavin MacLeod’s sardonic news writer Murray Slaughter) while trying to put on a popular local newscast of minimal integrity. One of The Mary Tyler Moore Show’s staunchest champions in CBS’s executive suite was Ethel Winant, one the few powerful women in TV in the ’60s and ’70s; she liked to tell the story about how, when she first started working at the network, there were no women’s executive bathrooms, so she had to use men’s bathroom and leave her shoes outside the door as a warning. Moore was a pioneer in that spirit, determined not just to carve out a place for herself, but fortify and sustain it.

To that end, The Mary Tyler Moore show established Moore as one of the most influential independent producers in network TV. She and her business partner and husband, future NBC president Grant Tinker, founded MTM in 1969, and turned their first effort, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, into a multiple Emmy-winning ratings hit. The company went on to air The Bob Newhart Show, Rhoda, and Lou Grant (both spinoffs of The Mary Tyler Moore Show), The White Shadow, WKRP in Cincinnati, Hill Street Blues, Remington Steele, and St. Elsewhere.

Moore’s second most significant production after her self-named sitcom might be Hill Street Blues — an NBC police drama from future TV megaproducer Steven Bochco (and often written by future Deadwood creator David Milch) that fused tropes from the police procedural, the daytime soap opera, and the town Western, creating a show so blackly comic, unabashedly earthy, frankly sexual, and fundamentally adult in its worldview that it held almost zero appeal for kids. A great many cable dramas in the so-called “prestige” mode owe their existence to Hill Street, as well as to the hilarious and often-surreal hospital soap St. Elsewhere. Although their once-groundbreaking production techniques now seem like pokey classicism, their dry wit, empathy, and rigorous intelligence still shine through. You could say the same of sitcoms made by graduates of the MTM factory: Brooks, in particular, carried on in that tradition for decades, on everything from Taxi and The Simpsons to feature films like Terms of Endearment and As Good As It Gets (all of which were sometimes denigrated by critics as big-screen television comedies).

MTM’s logo was a self-deprecating parody of the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) logo, its proudly roaring lion replaced by Mary Tyler Moore’s meowing kitten, Mimsie. The logo changed depending on the series: The kitten at the end of The Bob Newhart Show said “meow” in Newhart’s voice, the one at the end of Hill Street Blues sported a little patrolman’s cap, and the one at the end of WKRP spun on a record player. When Mimsie died in 1988 at age 20, right before the final season of St. Elsewhere, the logo showed a still-framed image of Mimsie sleeping while an EKG pattern beeped. MTM’s cat logo summed up the company’s view of what television could be: a more intimate, inwardly directed cousin of cinema, not a direct competitor. This is an aspect of Moore’s legacy that I hope doesn’t get lost in the rush to talk about her likability and versatility onscreen. If you look at all the work that she put her name on as a producer, and all the careers that she helped nurture with and without Tinker (who left MTM after he and Moore divorced and he was named head of NBC), she followed in the footsteps of one her own role models, Lucille Ball, who co-founded Desilu with her co-star and husband Desi Arnaz and shepherded many legendary series, including The Andy Griffith Show, Star Trek, and Mission: Impossible, onto television.

But Mary Tyler Moore the performer will always be the first thing we think of. She was an expert farcical comic, screwball heroine, hoofer, and pratfaller (her “Raaahhhhhhb!” on The Dick Van Dyke Show is a worthy successor to Lucille Ball’s “Rick-EEEEEEEE!”). There was often a sense that Moore’s characters (Mary more than the others) lived life at a very slight remove from everyone around her, and were more thoughtful and watchful than the rest, though perhaps less naturally happy. Robert Redford cannily recognized the dark side of such a personality when he cast her as the withholding mother in Ordinary People who can’t connect with anyone, even her own son — a role for which Moore received an Academy Award nomination and stunned people who thought of her mainly as a comic performer. (You were only surprised if you hadn’t seen her 1978 TV movie First, You Cry, about a newscaster whose mastectomy changes her life.) Moore never seemed to be demanding that you look at her, but you could not take your eyes off her. She somehow managed to hold the screen while surrounded by characters that outshone her in energy and strangeness (a configuration Moore herself approved as producer), and yet that same faintly reticent, measured quality also suggested an inner strength, a rocklike solidity confirmed by Moore’s lifelong success at defining her image and career on her terms.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:37 PM   #25
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RIP. Mary Tyler Moore will be missed.
She was a very well known actress.

I know duplicate RIP threads can be made for big celebs. She was on more than one show.
When the time comes and we lose Betty White, Michael J. Fox, etc. it will be understandable to see two threads on different boards at SO. When John Ritter passed away that was a big shock.

The Mary Tyler Moore Show was great. It was on before my time, but It was so funny.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:46 PM   #26
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Remember the Mary-thons, years ago...I forget, either on Nick at Nite or TV Land?

Besides all the accolades about being a groundbreaking show, MTM Show really was a super-funny sitcom from the get-go. The pilot episode was an LOL scream...who can forget some of the lines like, "I hate spunk", and "That was mother's news", and Mary's (wrapping up Lou's drunken letter) "All my love, Lou"? And while many other shows kind of flail around in the first season, MTM took off running with other memorable episodes, like Paul Sand and the calculator (adding machine, at the time). And it just kept getting better...Mary's parties, Chuckles the Clown dying, brilliantly acted by Mary. And the final episode--who can forget the group hug? There are many more etched in our memories.

RIP, MTM!
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:08 PM   #27
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http://www.kesq.com/news/local-icon-...oore/292894781

Local icon Gavin MacLeod distraught over death of Mary Tyler Moore
By: Patrick Edgell

Posted: Jan 25, 2017 03:55 PM PST



Local icon Gavin MacLeod distraught over death of Mary Tyler Moore
MGN Online & PBS


PALM SPRINGS, Calif. - KESQ News Channel 3 and CBS Local 2 is hearing reaction from a local costar of TV icon Mary Tyler Moore, as the legendary actress passed away Wednesday morning.

Gavin MacLeod starred as Murray Slaughter on the Mary Tyler Moore show from 1970-1977. His long career began in films in 1957, according to Wikipedia. He was also well-known for his starring role on The Love Boat from 1977-1986.

MacLeod released the following statement to KESQ News Channel 3 and CBS Local 2 Wednesday afternoon:

A line from our theme song was "Love is all around", and that's what it was for 5 days a week for seven years straight on the Mary Tyler Moore set.

It was all because of Mary! She was professional; she was extremely creative with a terrific sense of humor and a gifted actress. She set a pace for all of us to follow. So I consider those seven years working with this very special person as a gift from God. It goes with out saying what a wonderful loving and caring person she was to everyone who worked on the show. Mary was America's sweetheart and she was mine also. I was the luckiest guy in the world just sitting next to her and looking at her beautiful face…and legs!

One of my favorite shows was when Murray turned 40 years old and woke up thinking he was in love with Mary…but "Chuckles Bites The Dust" remains one of the classic comedy episodes of all time.

Today, "sadness is all around" for all of us and I will miss Mary…deeply.
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:15 PM   #28
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http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/t...oore/97065260/

Ed Asner says Mary Tyler Moore had spunk, and this time he liked it
Bill Keveney , USA TODAY Published 9:47 p.m. ET Jan. 25, 2017 |

When it comes to Mary Tyler Moore, Edward Asner differs with his Mary Tyler Moore Show alter ego, Lou Grant.

"She had spunk," says Asner, paraphrasing the gruff but lovable newsman who professed to hate spunk in a classic scene with Moore's Mary Richards. But does Asner hate spunk? "No. Not when she has it."

"I loved her. The world loved her — and it should have," Asner told USA TODAY hours after Moore's death Wednesday at 80. "She was an inspiration to women and she was a good example as a human being. And, of course, she was a fighter."


Moore's newsroom associate producer, Mary Richards, a single working woman in her 30s, became a role model for many when the iconic comedy launched its seven-season run in 1970.


When Mary arrived in Minneapolis after a broken engagement, "She showed how a girl forges onward, upward and makes it on her own, as the (theme) song says," Asner says from Toronto, where he's working on an independent film, The Parting Glass.




When Mary premiered, Asner says, he had no idea some would eventually pronounce it the greatest sitcom ever, or that it would be so beloved 40 years after ending its run in 1977. However, "As we began to work on it and shape it and round it, it became quite revealing to us that we were doing the Lord’s work," he says.

Asner praises Moore's generosity to her fellow actors, who earned stardom and eventually their own shows, including Asner's Lou Grant drama spinoff. The cast also included Valerie Harper, Cloris Leachman, Gavin MacLeod, Ted Knight, Betty White and Georgia Engel.



Moore "never missed an (opportunity) to advance us. She took good care of us," he says. "We worshipped her. We were all eager to throw ourselves on our swords for her."

Asked if he had a favorite episode or scene featuring Moore, Asner cites the famed "Chuckles Bites the Dust" episode, but then broadens his perspective. "You could take any of those shows and watch them and celebrate. I love them all."
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Old 01-25-2017, 11:04 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Mr. Television
http://deadline.com/2017/01/mary-tyl...ay-1201894305/

CBS To Honor Mary Tyler Moore With Primetime Special Thursday
by Lisa de Moraes
January 25, 2017 3:28pm

UPDATED with rebroadcast of PBS documentary: CBS said this afternoon it will air a special one-hour CBS News tribute to Mary Tyler Moore, who died today at 80.

Gayle King will anchor Mary Tyler Moore: Love Is All Around, to air at 9 PM ET. And yes, Oprah Winfrey will be among those who weigh in, though she was not involved in any of Moore’s iconic TV series and there are still plenty of people around who were. Some of those presumably will participate in the special, though CBS News did not name any of them.

PBS, on the other hand, said its stations will rebroadcast Mary Tyler Moore: A Celebration in honor of the TV icon. The documentary, which first aired in 2015, commemorates Moore and her 50-plus-year career,and features names such as Dick Van Dyke, Betty White, and Valerie Harper, who actually were involved in Moore’s life and work. Check local PBS stations for details.

CBS took guff in some quarters today when it briefly interrupted its daytime schedule for Scott Pelley to report that Moore had died. Moore was a huge CBS star, including her roles as Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show in the 1960s, and as the single woman with a career in TV journalism on The Mary Tyler Moore Show in the ’70s.

CBS News said the special will “mine CBS’ vast archives ” and include “interviews with Oprah Winfrey, newsmakers, admirers and others.”

Susan Zirinsky is the senior executive producer of the CBS special.
I wonder what time it will be on.
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Old 01-25-2017, 11:22 PM   #30
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Great talent, she was a major part of the best comedy series of the 1960's, and the star of the best comedy series of the 1970's. Wonderful dramatic actress, I would like to see the Dick Van Dyke reunion special (I believe it was broadcast on Nick At Nite). We've lost a television icon, one of the biggest.
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