View Single Post
Old 10-02-2020, 06:55 PM   #474
marahnna
Member
Frequent Poster
 
marahnna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 04, 2007
Location: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Posts: 53
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Mueller View Post
Logan had a lot of developmental disabilities because of what he went through as an infant. Knowing what I've heard about kids in similar situations, they don't usually live a regular life span. I would assume that's the case here, so he likely died of natural causes.

Sounds like he was a wonderful young man. It was encouraging to read his obituary, and I hope his family is at peace with his passing. RIP, Logan...
As the sister of a young man born with severe developmental disabilities, I can confirm this. My brother Adam was born with congenital encephalopathy, cerebral palsy, and a seizure disorder. I realize that Logan was not born with these conditions but acquired them due to the incident featured on UM, but the end results are largely the same - people with developmental disabilities are often limited in their movements, which does not allow them to build muscle, including cardiac development. Many cannot chew or even swallow food, which makes getting the proper nutrients more challenging. Depending on the extent of their disabilities, they are more susceptible to injury and lack either the understanding to know or the ability to tell someone when something doesn't feel right. In Adam's case, he was nonverbal, incontinent, confined to a wheelchair, and suffered lifelong issues with constipation, which is common among people with mobility challenges. Given these factors, he developed colon cancer, which is usually normally fairly treatable if caught early, but due to his conditions, the staff at the group home he lived at didn't become aware of his condition until it was far too late. He died in 2016 at the age of 41. Having lived through this pain myself, I'm so sorry for Logan's family and friends.
marahnna is offline   Reply With Quote