Sitcoms Online - Main Page / Message Boards - Main Page / News Blog / Photo Galleries / DVD Reviews / Buy TV Shows on DVD and Blu-ray

View Today's Active Threads / View New Posts / Mark All Boards Read / Chit Chat Board

Unsolved Mysteries Online Main Page / Message Board / Show History / Episode Guide (1987-2002) / Expanded Episode Guide #2 / Expanded Episode Guide #3 / Case Updates / Wiki / Official Site / Lifetime Site / Lifetime Schedule / Related Links / True Crime Shows Message Board / All Other Cases Message Board / Buy The Best of Unsolved Mysteries DVD / Buy Unsolved Mysteries - The Ultimate Collection DVD

Unsolved Mysteries: Original Robert Stack Episodes - The Complete First Season

Watch or Buy Unsolved Mysteries: Original Robert Stack Episodes - The Complete First Season on Amazon Instant Video
/
Season 2
/ Season 3 / Season 4 /
Season 5
/ Season 6 / Season 7 /
Season 8
/ Season 9 / Season 10 /
Season 11
/ Season 12 / Watch on YouTube

Unsolved Mysteries with Dennis Farina Episodes

Watch or Buy Unsolved Mysteries with Dennis Farina - The Complete First Season Episodes on Amazon Instant Video
/ Season 2 / Season 3 / Season 4 / Season 5 / Season 6 / Season 7 / Season 8 / Watch on YouTube


Unsolved Mysteries: UFOs

Buy Unsolved Mysteries: UFOs DVD Set
Unsolved Mysteries: Ghosts

Buy Unsolved Mysteries: Ghosts DVD Set
Unsolved Mysteries: Miracles

Buy Unsolved Mysteries: Miracles DVD Set
Unsolved Mysteries: Bizarre Murders

Buy Unsolved Mysteries: Bizarre Murders DVD Set
Unsolved Mysteries: Psychics

Buy Unsolved Mysteries: Psychics DVD Set
Unsolved Mysteries: Strange Legends

Buy Unsolved Mysteries: Strange Legends DVD Set

Sitcoms Online Message Boards - Forums  

Go Back   Sitcoms Online Message Boards - Forums > Unsolved Mysteries

Notices

SitcomsOnline.com News Blog Headlines Twitter Facebook Instagram RSS

Netflix Gets More Original Comedies Including Mike Myers Series; The CW Summer 2019 Schedule
Archer: 1999 Launches May 29; Hulu Gets More Aidy Bryant
Remembering Georgia Engel of The Mary Tyler Moore Show; BET Gets Another Comedy Series
ABC Mid-Season Pilot Review: Bless This Mess - Premieres Tuesday (April 16); Hallmark Picks Up 7th Season of When Calls the Heart
Sitcom Stars on Talk Shows; This Week in Sitcoms (Week of April 15, 2019)
SitcomsOnline Digest: Disney Announces New Streaming Service Including Every Episode of The Simpsons; NCIS Gets Renewal from CBS
Fri-Yay: Why NBC's Abby's Deserves a Chance; Netflix Orders Adult Animated Comedy Q-Force


New on DVD/Blu-ray (February/March/April)

Step by Step - The Complete Fourth Season What I Like About You - The Complete Fourth Season Hangin' with Mr. Cooper - The Complete Second Season Alice - The Complete Ninth Season The Wayans Bros. - The Complete Fifth Season

02/05 - Family Guy - Part 1 - Volumes 1-5
02/05 - Family Guy - Part 2 - Volumes 6-10
02/05 - Family Guy - Part 3 - Seasons 10-14
02/05 - First Lady of Television - Betty White Collection (40 rare and acclaimed episodes from her early days in television)
02/05 - Mama's Family - Seasons 1-6 - The Complete Series
02/12 - Rick and Morty - The Complete Seasons 1-3 (Blu-ray)
02/12 - Step by Step - The Complete Fourth Season
02/26 - What I Like About You - The Complete Fourth Season
03/05 - Hangin' with Mr. Cooper - The Complete Second Season (WBShop.com)
03/12 - Alice - The Complete Ninth Season (WBShop.com)
03/26 - The Wayans Bros. - The Complete Fifth Season (WBShop.com)
04/02 - Archer: Danger Island - The Complete Season Nine
04/09 - You're the Worst - The Complete Fifth Season
04/12 - Evening Shade - The Complete Collection
04/16 - The Big C - The Complete Series (Blu-ray)
More TV DVD Releases / DVD Reviews Archive / SitcomsOnline Digest


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-02-2007, 01:01 AM   #1
SiberianKiss
Member
Frequent Poster
 
SiberianKiss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 08, 2006
Posts: 202
Default Los Angeles Bank Robbers who tunneled their way into vaults

official thread for the hole in the ground gang. featured on UM 2/22/1989

discuss
SiberianKiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2007, 05:11 PM   #2
Fletch
Justice for Russell
Forum Regular
 
Fletch's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 10, 2002
Posts: 385
Default

Fletch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2007, 09:20 PM   #3
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

Update: I've finally got the book with the related chapter in my shopping cart at Amazon.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2007, 09:52 PM   #4
crystaldawn
Member
Senior Member
 
crystaldawn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 17, 2002
Location: Illinois
Posts: 4,110
Default

You'll have to let us know any more info it gives you in the book Awsi. Does anyone know if they were ever caught?
crystaldawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2007, 10:17 PM   #5
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

They were never caught. SiberianKiss has already read the book. I'm surprised he didn't provide info on what it said. Maybe he's too busy jousting on the USC football forum. They don't like some of my opinions over there, either.

It may be a while before I acquire the book. My shopping cart is $199.34. My current gift certificates settle at $85.88. Yesterday while leaning on one before paying a utility bill, I noticed the ripoff Coinstar machines provide Amazon gift certificates and at full value, without the 8.9% theft. I always have leftover change from the machines so today's brainstorm is to dump the daily allotment into a cup and then eventually turn it into the missing $114.

That strategy will probably last a few days until I realize how ridiculous it is.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2007, 07:10 AM   #6
kadrmas15
Retired from Board 03/03/11
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 11, 2006
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,892
Default

Wow, never caught huh? Amazing. Although these guys seem smarter than average so I guess it shouldnt be surprising to me they havent been caught. I wonder if they started this up in any other parts of the country? It was a pretty intelligent way they went about the whole thing so that tells me they put a ton of studying and effort into it. They made millions of dollars so I guess they could live off it the rest of their lives if they wanted. How much did they make over the course of their robberies? 10 mil? I just remember it was millions of dollars. I would be very curious to see if these kinds of robberies happened in any other parts of the country or in Canada or Europe.
kadrmas15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2007, 02:22 PM   #7
SiberianKiss
Member
Frequent Poster
 
SiberianKiss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 08, 2006
Posts: 202
Default

nm

Last edited by SiberianKiss; 05-08-2015 at 03:17 AM.
SiberianKiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2007, 09:05 PM   #8
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SiberianKiss
by the end of this year, I think I will have found them, if I'm lucky. then i'm gonna write a book.

they didn't get that much $$$$$$, mainly because the feds were on to them in the middle of their second heist, they had JUST gotten into the vault when the bank manager was opening the vault door. So the tunnel boys had to run like hell for their freedom and leave behind all the loot. then the cops found the third tunnel, they did two at once, unreal. Unfortunately they didn't put much into the bank robbery aspect, only their awesome tunneling which is superb. If they had just paid a little attention to bank security details, they would've cleaned out both the second and the third bank and then they would've gotten about $20 million. The 2nd and 3rd tunnel failures robbed them of the notoriety this brilliant crime should've received. The first heist was a success though. All together, they got about $2.5 million total. Like $200,000 in cash and the rest is what they got from the safety deposit boxes.

they were the last ones to tunnel their way into any vaults in the US. i think law enforcement was kind of in awe of them, all that work, all that perfection, on the UM segment the detective that was on the case said "we view this as the crime of the century as far as burglaries are concerned." That's why this was featured in that book Awsi is gonna get. It was one of the cases that stuck with the FBI guys.

Awsi they're freaking stupid over at uscfootball.com well not all of them but a lot. i think your posts are way over their heads. seriously, i love your posts, you have an esoteric knowledge of sports betting.
Well, I'm $3 closer to the Amazon order after a change of pace last night.

Funny, I don't mind making dozens of sports bets on a single day but departing with money for a material exchange almost makes me twitch. Got to be plenty of value.

Yeah, SiberianKiss got it right. These guys would be alltime legendary if they had pulled off the second and third heists cleanly and made megamillions. It's got to be tough figuring out the security aspects and how they vary from bank to bank. It's not like you can ask what happens with alarms if you tunnel into the vault from below. Can you imagine the, "oh sh**!" reaction when they heard the bank manager opening the vault.

They were bright to do multiple tunnels at once. The crime is so unusual it's naturally going to send authorities scrambling to locate additional tunnels. And only certain areas and banks were potential targets given location of the storm drains. I think the segment said they picked a holiday weekend and no doubt would have cleared out both vaults if the security system hadn't detected them. No doubt they realized the other tunnel would be located, and they probably never went back to it. Imagine the frustration after all that effort. If I were authorities I would have placed cameras outside those tunnels for years, to see if anyone came to stop and look at the entrance in strange fashion.

Actually, I think the USC football forum is very high caliber. I respect many of the posters quite a bit and only a few are pathetic, like your stalker. Miami's board is good also. Both are considerably more impressive than the national forum. That's where the goofs hang out.

But the anti-Notre Dame ferocity on the SC board surprises me. I guess Charlie Weis contributes to that. It's okay for SC fans to be arrogant but others can't go that route. So now anything associated with Notre Dame sucks. Sorry, but that's not reality and I'm not going there. I'm also not going to hang around a thread and post dozens of times back and forth with people who disagree with me. I had more than my fill of that in the marathon DB Cooper threads on this forum last year. Now I prefer to make a lengthy post or two with my primary opinions then move to something else.

But just wait until I start posting on the political forum over there. I just discovered it. Man, will I make some pissed off new enemies.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2007, 11:09 PM   #9
SiberianKiss
Member
Frequent Poster
 
SiberianKiss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 08, 2006
Posts: 202
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Awsi Dooger
Well, I'm $3 closer to the Amazon order after a change of pace last night.

Funny, I don't mind making dozens of sports bets on a single day but departing with money for a material exchange almost makes me twitch. Got to be plenty of value.

Yeah, SiberianKiss got it right. These guys would be alltime legendary if they had pulled off the second and third heists cleanly and made megamillions. It's got to be tough figuring out the security aspects and how they vary from bank to bank. It's not like you can ask what happens with alarms if you tunnel into the vault from below. Can you imagine the, "oh sh**!" reaction when they heard the bank manager opening the vault.

They were bright to do multiple tunnels at once. The crime is so unusual it's naturally going to send authorities scrambling to locate additional tunnels. And only certain areas and banks were potential targets given location of the storm drains. I think the segment said they picked a holiday weekend and no doubt would have cleared out both vaults if the security system hadn't detected them. No doubt they realized the other tunnel would be located, and they probably never went back to it. Imagine the frustration after all that effort. If I were authorities I would have placed cameras outside those tunnels for years, to see if anyone came to stop and look at the entrance in strange fashion.

Actually, I think the USC football forum is very high caliber. I respect many of the posters quite a bit and only a few are pathetic, like your stalker. Miami's board is good also. Both are considerably more impressive than the national forum. That's where the goofs hang out.

But the anti-Notre Dame ferocity on the SC board surprises me. I guess Charlie Weis contributes to that. It's okay for SC fans to be arrogant but others can't go that route. So now anything associated with Notre Dame sucks. Sorry, but that's not reality and I'm not going there. I'm also not going to hang around a thread and post dozens of times back and forth with people who disagree with me. I had more than my fill of that in the marathon DB Cooper threads on this forum last year. Now I prefer to make a lengthy post or two with my primary opinions then move to something else.

But just wait until I start posting on the political forum over there. I just discovered it. Man, will I make some pissed off new enemies.


No no all they needed to know is if the bank they were gonna rob used the time lock on their vaults. Then there wouldn't be any way to open it when they were in there. B of A has never used the time lock. It wouldn't be too hard with a bank branch that size and thousands of employees past and present to find out that info. Even if they robbed it anyway without the time lock, what they should have done is purposely set off the alarms ahead of time so on vault-busting day, the bank managers would've just thought it was a false alarm and thought there was a malfunction. This is what they inadvertently did during the first (successful) job. The alarms went off there too. However, in the week before the big weekend, their tools and digging was causing major problems with the bank. The power went out, it was because the tunnel boys tapped into their power system to run their tools. Other weird things were happening too. Lots of false alarms. And of course there was no way to open the vault to check.

You're right in that, for the first job, they planned it on Memorial Day weekend so they would have one more day to break into more safe deposit boxes. But they had trouble drilling up with the core bit so they had to cut their way through alllllll that concrete by hand when they were right under the vault. That took an extra week. Amazing! Can you imagine just sitting there for hours and hours sawing away in some man-made tunnel?

As for the third tunnel that they had completed but never got the chance to break into, what happened was...when the cops found it, see they were digging under a real busy street in Los Angeles. So they had to have engineers check out and see if it was possible for somebody driving to fall through the asphalt and into the tunnel. So there was a huge traffic jam and people going in and out of the sewers. Then the news got a hold of it and they couldn't keep it a secret. Another thing mentioned is that they had no place to hide a stakeout team in the sewers even if they kept it a secret.

I know what you mean when you talk about how frustrated they were after all that work. The first one was a success but they were really amateurs when it came to robbing banks. They didn't bring proper tools to bust into the safety deposit boxes and couldn't get them all. That's something the FBI noticed right away. Amazing tunnelers but amateur robbers. For the second and third tunnels though, they brought much better box-busting tools with them. If only they had purposely set off the alarms a week before. They would've cleaned out both banks. I wish they would've hahaha. In the second robbery, they did get $98,000 though. They had to haul ass outta there obviously.

see my avatar Awsi? that's the composite sketch of the suspect they showed on the UM segment. what i don't understand is Robert Stack said "sales people came up with two different composite sketches of the same man." How can you have two different sketches of the same guy? The faces are similar but the hair is completely different. Doesn't make sense to me. Maybe long periods of time had passed from when certain witnesses sold them the tools and the ATV's? Another thing, maybe they are brothers, two different people but related?

I personally think there was three of them, maybe 4 but that's it. the book said perhaps 4-5. There was definitely a look-out up top at all times. I think there were two guys digging and one guy up top....3 total.
SiberianKiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2007, 09:03 PM   #10
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

I finally got the book and read the Hole in the Ground Gang chapter. SiberianKiss described the basics very well. It looks like what foiled the sewer rats was too much focus and ability regarding the tunneling but no emphasis or knowledge about banks and their security system.

The first one in '86 went well but they didn't capitalize as much as they could have via less than ideal tools. They pried open the smaller safety deposit boxes which was an inferior strategy. It made the surrounding boxes unavailable due to the flanges of jagged metal suddenly covering them up. For every box they opened they closed off access to the ones on top, bottom and sides of the opened one. More sophisticated bank robbers like the Dinsio gang from Ohio used a sledgehammer and a two-headed punch.

In the first robbery the diamond-studded core bit also slipped and they couldn't steady it while trying to drill upward through the 18 inch bottom of the vault. That foiled the plans to hit on the long Memorial Day weekend. They had to spend an extra week chipping away at the vault floor with concrete saws and hand drills. Keep in mind they were working in less than ideal conditions. The tunnel was described as being 3 feet by 3 feet in some areas, properly rounded and not square to lessen likelihood of collapse, then somewhat bigger in others including occasional chambers. The chamber underneath the vault was 4 feet wide and 5.5 feet high. So unless these were midget bandits they were forced to crouch and hold heavy tools above their heads for long periods. It had to be excruciating labor.

I'll include several smaller posts instead of marathon ones. But here's a funny note regarding the first robbery; a bank manager who was working late heard noises several times and reported them to the central security offices. She described them as a grinding sound. He checked his sensors and assured her nothing seemed askew, that the sound sensors in the vault had not been activated.

Get this, he told her what she was hearing was probably just a rat running around inside the walls.

She was flabbergasted and even held the phone up against the vault so the guy downtown could hear the sound, but since his monitors still showed nothing and the noise soon stopped, she gave up.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2007, 09:44 PM   #11
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

Here's something that SiberianKiss mentioned but I didn't fully grasp until reading the book. What foiled this crew was lack of knowledge regarding different practices than standard by Bank of America, specifically not using the time lock on the vault door. At the end of each business day the manager typically sets the time lock to make the vault inaccessible until the morning of the next business day. Once the time lock was set the vault couldn't be opened even in a dire emergency, other than by drilling out the vault door.

That aspect acted as a comfort zone to robbers tunneling from below. Even if they tripped alarms or caused other noises they knew the vault likely would not be suspected as a source since it was time locked shut. Also no one could disturb them inside the vault, as long as they were in there during off hours, i.e. a weekend.

The first bank caper was at First Interstate Bank in Hollywood. They followed the typical practice regarding time locking the vault. That's why the bank manager could only listen to the suspicious noises and hold the phone to the vault door for the person at central security to hear. But the tunnel gang was pathetically unaware that their second target, a Bank of America at the corner of Pico and La Cienega, did not follow the same procedure. Bank of America was skeptical of the time lock approach so they stayed away from it in favor of a double combination approach with two employees knowing separate sections of a vault combination. That allowed after-hours access in case of emergency.

So when the sewer rats were in that Bank of America vault in August 1987 they probably weren't overly concerned until they heard the tumblers moving and realized the vault was about to spring open. At that point they had to scram, and left behind many items including plenty of cash on the counters of the vault.

The other completed tunnel -- never used -- was beneath a savings and loan in Beverly Hills. That savings and loan was open on Saturday. So the plan no doubt was to clean out the Bank of America on Friday night and throughout Saturday, and then hit the savings and loan on Saturday night and into Sunday. On Monday morning both capers would have been discovered virtually simultaneously and the robbers become world famous, the biggest bank robberies in history with a take of $10 to $25 million.

BTW, I agree with SiberianKiss that likely 3 robbers were involved, not the 4-5 suspected in the book. Two tunnelers and one guy observing above and giving info via walkie-talkie.

I'd also guarantee it took longer for the tunnels to be dug than the author guesses. He thinks weeks, maybe months. I'd say several months. That type of backbreaking work in tight and dark claustrophobic spaces requires taking a break, and breaks of many days to regroup mentally and physically. You can't simply estimate how many feet they probably worked per day and then multiply by number of days it required. They'll run into unexpected obstacles along with the physical exertion. It takes time to plan the next move and make adjustments from your original ideas. Plus there's also factors of daily lives, things you want to do or need to do apart from nightly tunneling. If a friend or relative wants to visit or go somewhere you can't make excuse after excuse of never being available. With at least three guys you multiply that reality by 3+. And once in a while the outside of the sewer was probably simply not available due to unexpected activity or cars parked where they normally would not be. Inexperienced robbers like that are going to be suspicious and cautious when something looks different along their point of entry and exit.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2007, 12:03 AM   #12
SiberianKiss
Member
Frequent Poster
 
SiberianKiss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 08, 2006
Posts: 202
Default

oh great posts, this is the best UM

I drove by the 2nd and 3rd banks today, they're still there, the 2nd one is still a Bank of America, the other one is different now. I'm sure very few people ever realize when they drive by that that was the last bank anyone ever tunneled their way into, at least here in the USA.

damn i wish they would've hit both and succeeded. if only they had put even 1/10th as much work into bank security procedure as they did in tunneling.
SiberianKiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2007, 03:42 AM   #13
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

That chapter was great to read. The author provides plenty of filler but it's interesting and well written filler.

In the Hole in the Ground Gang chapter he tells all about the famous Laguna Niguel robbery in 1972, the Dinsio gang entering through the roof top. That robbery is featured in shows on Court TV and the Discovery Channel. The basics are all the same in the book but one thing amazed me.

I assumed the finger prints -- found on the dishes in the dishwasher that was never turned on -- were gathered shortly after the crime. But this book says the break in the case was a similar robbery in Lordstown, Ohio 6 weeks after Laguna Niguel. Only at that point did the authorities have names to check and traced them to southern California. When they finally found the condo they saw the dishwasher had not been turned on.

So that means the dirty dishes sat there for 2 months after the robbers departed. Hard to believe. It was described as a plush condo even though it rented for only $500 per month at the time, which shows how much has changed in 35 years.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2007, 03:49 AM   #14
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SiberianKiss
oh great posts, this is the best UM

I drove by the 2nd and 3rd banks today, they're still there, the 2nd one is still a Bank of America, the other one is different now. I'm sure very few people ever realize when they drive by that that was the last bank anyone ever tunneled their way into, at least here in the USA.

damn i wish they would've hit both and succeeded. if only they had put even 1/10th as much work into bank security procedure as they did in tunneling.
That's exactly what I was thinking while reading the chapter. DAMN. Why didn't they get away with it?

It would have been a legendary caper along the lines of DB Cooper. Plus in this one you've got a true whodunit not an obvious case of someone doing it again months later.

Plus, look at it this way; if they had gotten away with it they most likely would have been caught by now. Extremely likely. The case would have been so high profile the focus would have been 100 fold. Amateur sleuths would have looked into it relentlessly.

And these guys inevitably make a basic mistake, like the wife of the Trench Coat robber who complained about the workmanship on her cash-bought custom home and the builder turned her in as suspicious.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2007, 04:04 AM   #15
Awsi Dooger
Member
Senior Member
 
Awsi Dooger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 18, 2003
Location: Miami
Posts: 1,507
Default

LOL. The author wasn't exactly impressed with the quality of tips he got from UM. I'll include what he wrote, word for word:

"In 1989, eighteen months after the second set of tunnels, Dennis Pagenkopp and the Burglary Special guys got the NBC reality crime show Unsolved Mysteries to do a segment on the three tunnel jobs. The show generated a couple hundred telephone tips, but it was the usual tipster circus; tunnel rats, troglodytes, Chinese commies burrowing through the earth. One caller insisted, for reasons that were unclear, that it was Hopi Indians. Absolutely nothing solid to work with.

"And it still goes on. Every time that Unsolved Mysteries episode is repeated in syndication -- the last time was in 1998 -- more hopeless tips trickle in."

The book, BTW, was published in 2003. It was a segment that Lifetime seemed to run very seldom.

The author stresses that the statute of limitations has run out, and that even if they confessed all he could do was congratulate them and buy them a no-hard-feelings beer.

Yeah, right. I'd love to wager on that. You know damn well they would find some trumped up semi-related charge. Hell, they tunneled underground and broke into property. They filed off serial numbers and used false names while buying the equipment, including the amusing name Robert Spaulding to buy the ATVs. I'm sure the robbers got a kick out of that. Spaulding was the name of the Hollywood street where they tunneled into the first bank.
Awsi Dooger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:37 AM.


Frequently Asked Questions

1) How do I contact Unsolved Mysteries with information on segments?

If you any information on cases, you can contact them via:

Website: www.unsolved.com

Contact form on official Unsolved Mysteries site

Please note that their old mailing address and 1-800 phone number no longer work.


2) Where can I watch Unsolved Mysteries?

Lifetime

Lifetime Schedule / Lifetime Site

Escape Schedule / Escape Site


Although the administrators and moderators of the Sitcoms Online Message Boards will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this forum, it is impossible for us to review all messages. All messages express the views of the author, and neither the owners of the Sitcoms Online Message Boards, nor vBulletin Solutions Inc. (developers of vBulletin) will be held responsible for the content of any message. The owners of the Sitcoms Online Message Boards reserve the right to remove, edit, move or close any thread for any reason.

VigLink badge

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions Inc.