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Old 03-02-2011, 03:30 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by TV Knowledge Fan
"Grindl, She-Wolf Of Wall Street", originally telecast on September 29, 1963, although I suspect it's a spring '64 repeat [I've seen that episode with the P&G bumpers, and no commercials, dammit!].

If you were able to sit through a full episode of Grindl, I give you credit. I couldn't do it.
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Old 03-06-2011, 06:55 PM   #17
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We all have our favorites but having never seen Mr. Terrific or Grindl as a kid but only as an adult, I find both to be awful. A show I did watch and liked as an 8 year old was Camp Runamuck but when I saw it again as an adult I found it horrible. Same with Baileys of Balboa. I liked it at 7 but at 27, not so much.

Just curious, but what is his criteria for inclusion in the book? Because certainly shows like The People's Choice had pretty good syndication, running well into the 80s and even having national exposure on The Nostalgia Channel.
Gee, it's been a while since I looked at the book, but I believe his number one criterion was that the shows are, for all intents and purposes, virtually forgotten by the general public today. (Unlike Lucy or Gilligan or The Beverly Hillbillies which, by varying degrees, remain a part of our collective consciousness.)
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Old 03-08-2011, 03:30 AM   #18
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Gee, it's been a while since I looked at the book, but I believe his number one criterion was that the shows are, for all intents and purposes, virtually forgotten by the general public today. (Unlike Lucy or Gilligan or The Beverly Hillbillies which, by varying degrees, remain a part of our collective consciousness.)

If that's the criteria, you could basically include almost every sitcom from the 50s and 60s, except for a handful. I don't think you could even name 30 shows from those 2 decades that HAVEN'T been forgotten today.
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:31 AM   #19
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If that's the criteria, you could basically include almost every sitcom from the 50s and 60s, except for a handful. I don't think you could even name 30 shows from those 2 decades that HAVEN'T been forgotten today.
I don't know anything about the book's sales figures or demographics. Still, as an overview/sampling rather than a detailed history of the phenomenon of forgotten sit-coms, it may have piqued the interest of some casual TV buffs who might not wish to wade through every bit of relevant information. Or, rather than being read cover-to-cover, it can sit waiting on the shelf on the off chance that some bit familiarity with one of the series needs to be demonstrated. (This is the position that the book now fills in my personal library.)

No need to fatten the book or the cover price by including sections on both Mr. Terrific AND Captain Nice.

I've gotta figure that, like the shows themselves, this book is nothing more than a curiosity to the general public. I can't imagine anyone other than die-hards like us having much real interest in the subject at all. But I don't know enough about publishing to really say what the target audience or final objective was.
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Old 03-09-2011, 03:16 AM   #20
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Some of my favorite shows would be in this category. He and She, Love on a Rooftop, Occasional Wife, Many Happy Returns, Accidental Family, Nancy, The Tycoon, Hank, The Jean Arthur Show, Run Buddy Run, The Good Guys, Governor and JJ, Pistols n Petticoats, Mr. Roberts, No Time For Sergeants, Room for One More, Broadside, Mickey, Wendy and Me, Second Hundred Years are all big favorites of mine. The only shows of that ilk that I really liked but now can't watch as an adult are Its About Time, Baileys of Balboa and Camp Runamuck. I find them all as unwatchable as Gilligan's Island or The Brady Bunch.
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Old 03-13-2011, 11:14 AM   #21
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For me, it's virtually impossible to discount nostalgia when assessing the entertainment value of these series. Even a quality program like The Dick Van Dyke Show occupies an honored place in my collection, in part, because of the golden memories attached to it.

Honestly, I've got to admit that it's doubtful I would be quite so wild about Mr. Terrific if I were seeing it for the first time as an adult in 2011. But we'll never really know for certain, because the truth is I did see it and love it as an 8-year-old in 1967. And I still, very much, enjoy it now.

There are other shows that aren't as good as I remember (F-Troop, My Favorite Martian, Captain Nice etc., etc.), but I still enjoy revisiting them. Lately, though it's been years, I've had a bit of an urge to pick up some Gilligan DVDs. Heaven knows, even I remember the scripts being pretty contrived and silly. I just really kind of miss those seven characters.

One rare exception to my nostalgia credit factor is Run, Buddy, Run. I absolutely loved it as a kid; almost as much as the show that replaced it: Mr. Terrific. But the 2 episodes I've seen in recent years did absolutely zero for me. I don't hate it. I just have no desire to see it again. (Though I'm sure I would sit through more episodes, if I had them handy.)
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Old 03-13-2011, 03:05 PM   #22
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I never saw Mr. Terrific when I was a kid. I know it was midseason. What did it air opposite? Obviously something else I was more interested in. Never watched Captain Nice until much later either.

The two problems with Run Buddy Run were that one, it was a one-joke show and a pretty thin premise for a series and two, Jack Sheldon was a terrible actor and a bad choice for a lead. Had they had a better lead, the show could have been better as Bruce Gordon was terrific.

You are right in that nostalgia plays a big part but only if the show isn't awful. I can't watch Camp Runamuck anymore no matter how much I liked it when I was 8.
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Old 03-13-2011, 06:04 PM   #23
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I'm pretty sure I Dream of Jeannie was on opposite Mr. Terrific. I don't know what was on ABC, though I don't think it was a comedy.

If I wasn't so lazy, I could find out easily enough. I have a copy of almost every TV Guide from the period when Mr. Terrific aired. That's what I've been collecting, since I finally got all of the episodes. (Just recently lucked into the ever elusive, first Star Trek cover TV Guide from 1967. I got it for just 25 bucks, because the eBay seller neglected to put the title "Star Trek" in the description.)

I'm sure I told you about my friend who used to always talk about The Double Life of Henry Phyfe. When I offered to lend him copies of some episodes he refused, because he didn't want an adult perspective to mar his cherished childhood memories.

He was pretty smart, but I've got to say, even though Phyfe is not as great as I remember it, MY cherished memories are pretty much intact.
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:39 AM   #24
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Terrific replaced Run Buddy Run. I must have switched over to I Dream of Jeannie. Superhero shows have never interested me. I remember I was one of only 3 kids in my third grade class who didn't abandon Lost In Space for Batman when it came on in January of 1966.
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Old 03-14-2011, 10:15 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TV Knowledge Fan
"Grindl, She-Wolf Of Wall Street", originally telecast on September 29, 1963, although I suspect it's a spring '64 repeat [I've seen that episode with the P&G bumpers, and no commercials, dammit!].

Funny, I actually loved "Grindl" and wish there were more episodes around. I thought Imogene Coca was a riot in the role.

This is the episode where she gives stock advice while answering phones at a Wall Street office.

The first episode where she goes to work at a magician's home, not knowing he is a magician, is also funny.
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Old 03-14-2011, 11:13 PM   #26
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"RUN, BUDDY, RUN" appeared opposite NBC's 'I DREAM OF JEANNIE" and the second half of ABC's "THE IRON HORSE" (a Western)- both of which, combined, had a bigger audience than "BUDDY". This is why CBS hastily scheduled "MR. TERRIFIC" as its mid-season replacement.

For those who weren't aware of it, "THE DOUBLE LIFE OF HENRY PHYFE" [from the same studio behind "THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES", "GREEN ACRES" and "THE ADDAMS FAMILY"] was a Red Buttons vehicle in which he played a "normal" guy who has to pose as a deceased secret agent (who was everything he isn't), while trying to maintain a "normal life" with his job and girlfriend. It lasted 17 episodes in early 1966.

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Old 03-20-2011, 12:19 PM   #27
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"RUN, BUDDY, RUN" appeared opposite NBC's 'I DREAM OF JEANNIE" and the second half of ABC's "THE IRON HORSE" (a Western)- both of which, combined, had a bigger audience than "BUDDY". This is why CBS hastily scheduled "MR. TERRIFIC" as its mid-season replacement.

For those who weren't aware of it, "THE DOUBLE LIFE OF HENRY PHYFE" [from the same studio behind "THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES", "GREEN ACRES" and "THE ADDAMS FAMILY"] was a Red Buttons vehicle in which he played a "normal" guy who has to pose as a deceased secret agent (who was everything he isn't), while trying to maintain a "normal life" with his job and girlfriend. It lasted 17 episodes in early 1966.


Actually, the ratings on Run Buddy Run had begun to pick up after a couple of months and CBS had second thoughts about the cancellation. Unfortunately, by the time they wanted to continue with it, all of the sets had been broken down and it wasn't possible to resume production. That's back in the days when a show still stayed on after cancellation to run off all of the filmed episodes. Funny, but I was just reading Cleveland Amory's TV Guide review and he really liked the show a lot and had it listed after Love on a Rooftop as his second favorite new comedy of that year. Of course he also hated He and She so I don't know how much weight he should get for his reviews.
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Old 09-27-2011, 02:50 PM   #28
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Default "Lost Laughs"

If read carefully, the criteria that Mr. Tucker used for selecting the shows was not shows that were "one season wonders" or outright "bombs". He has selected shows that are now pretty much out of the public eye. "The People's Choice" and "Hennesey" both ran for three seasons and were popular in their day, but are seldom, if ever seen today. Giving an unbiased critique is the privelige of the author. He did not love all the shows I remember him listing either, but taste is certainly a matter of opinion, and I did agree with about ninety per cent of his opinions. My personal favorite of the 30 shows profiled was "Pete and Gladys", which ran for two seasons in prime time and was repeated on the CBS morning schedule for two more years after that. I must agree, however, with Mr. Tucker when he says that "the specter of Lucy is everywhere" in this series. The combination of this, compounded by the fact that Lucy returned to TV the year "Pete and Gladys" was cancelled certainly spelled doom for this series. As for "Captain Nice" and "Mr. Terrific", I recall watching both of these when I was about 14 and hating both of these.
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:58 AM   #29
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Unpopular short lived shows were called bombs back in the day when they were cancelled, so I find it interesting that now years later after peoples memories have faded, these same shows are now called "lost classics".
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Old 10-05-2011, 08:38 PM   #30
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Unpopular short lived shows were called bombs back in the day when they were cancelled, so I find it interesting that now years later after peoples memories have faded, these same shows are now called "lost classics".

That's why this book really is without much coherency. You could honestly call 2 and 3 season shows like Pete and Gladys, People's Choice and Henessey as lost since they all were syndicated. To put them in the same category as shows like My Living Doll and Grindl which ran one season and have never aired anywhere since makes no sense. He certainly could have filled the book with successful shows that are no longer being seen anywhere. Shows like The Gale Storm Show, Beulah and Life of Riley for instance have not been seen in decades.
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