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Old 09-12-2010, 04:15 AM   #31
mayberry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuck In The '70's
I think after Don Knotts left, it just wasn't the same for him. Don was his other half. He had nobody to play against.

It wasn't the same without Barney.

Knotts wanted for Andy to make him a partner and stay on the show.Andy would not do it because he was affraid it would hurt their friendship.
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Old 09-12-2010, 01:30 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayberry
It wasn't the same without Barney.

Knotts wanted for Andy to make him a partner and stay on the show.Andy would not do it because he was affraid it would hurt their friendship.

It would have cost Andy money, and plenty of it. He had a commitment from the network, so the dollars were all ready there without Don in the mix. Don also would have been cut in on the off network rights so making him a partner just wasn't going to happen. In the end it's business.
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Old 09-19-2010, 07:09 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duster76
It would have cost Andy money, and plenty of it. He had a commitment from the network, so the dollars were all ready there without Don in the mix. Don also would have been cut in on the off network rights so making him a partner just wasn't going to happen. In the end it's business.

Thanks, I never knew many of the details.
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Old 09-21-2010, 07:27 AM   #34
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TAGS is my favorite sitcom of all time, and will remain so. I have also heard the rumors about the "real-life" Andy, and frankly in many interviews (the one he did years ago with Ralph Emery on TNN comes to mind) some of that personality shows up. As an earlier poster stated, Griffith was likely a complicated individual who at times could be decent, and other times less than admirable. It is apparent that he did cultivate an entourage of actors, whom he remained true friends with, and whom he continued to use in Matlock. His friendships with Don Knotts and Ron Howard are apparently genuine. On the other hand if he didn't like someone, or vice-versa, this was apparently something that stuck. My conclusion is that Andy Griffith is a brilliant artist who is possessed with the stereotypical artistic temperament.

Jack Burns, a New Yorker, was ill-suited to play a deputy in rural North Carolina; not to mention the impossible task of following in Don Knotts' footsteps. The "Warren" character simply wasn't funny, and I find many of those episodes unwatchable. Later Burns' career as a comic took off in the 1970's when he teamed with Avery Schreiber, the taxi routine a classic. After Warren, Barney was more or less "replaced" by Goober, Howard, Emmit, Clara, et al folk depending on the story-line. Though the color episodes were not as good, that seemed to work pretty well, as the show really became about the town itself.

Speaking of Barney's "replacement," there is an interesting episode, the final one of the Don Knotts years. Ironically, it is an episode which didn't feature Knotts and in it Aunt Bea actually refers to Barney's position as deputy in the past-tense. It features Jerry Van Dyke as a banjo player who is fired from a carnival, and at one point decides to put on the deputy uniform, a decision which ultimately creates a few problems for Andy. I always wondered if that episode was meant to audition Van Dyke as the replacment, and didn't work out for whatever reason. I don't know if that is true, but that episode always makes me wonder.

One can say with a certain amount of confidence that George Lindsey and Griffith are not the best of chums. I read somewhere years ago that Lindsey was the original choice to play Gomer, until Griffith saw Jim Nabors perform a stand-up routine. Think of a hick version of Andy Kaufman's ill-at-ease immigrant stand-up who suddenly goes into the Elvis routine. Nabors would play a Gomer-type of character who would eventually begin singing in his famous baritone voice. Anyway, I believe it is possible that despite eventually winning a regular role on the show as Goober, Lindsey may have harbored some bitterness over being bumped from the first role. Then again that theory may be all wet.
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Old 09-21-2010, 08:05 AM   #35
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFwgzOxs0yM
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Old 09-11-2016, 03:23 PM   #36
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I hate to think of Andy as being a "jerk" but there are moments while watching the show where the guy who plays this lovable kindhearted sheriff has this look of anger and deep intensity on his face even in the most innocuous of scenes. Perhaps he was an alcoholic like Johnny Carson? I don't know much about his background but I know some people can get out of control angry when they drink too much. It would explain the mood swings. Or perhaps he was bi polar? Who knows?

Incidentally, his greatest performance was "A Face In The Crowd" where he played a very disturbed and narcissistic sociopath. It was chilling to watch. I thought he deserved the Academy Award for that one.
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Old 09-23-2016, 03:19 PM   #37
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I have never heard the Andy was mean or difficult to work with. The one on the show I heard that was difficult to work with was Aunt Bee(Frances Bavier).
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Old 11-06-2016, 02:09 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAllen
Speaking of Barney's "replacement," there is an interesting episode, the final one of the Don Knotts years. Ironically, it is an episode which didn't feature Knotts and in it Aunt Bea actually refers to Barney's position as deputy in the past-tense. It features Jerry Van Dyke as a banjo player who is fired from a carnival, and at one point decides to put on the deputy uniform, a decision which ultimately creates a few problems for Andy. I always wondered if that episode was meant to audition Van Dyke as the replacment, and didn't work out for whatever reason. I don't know if that is true, but that episode always makes me wonder.

Jerry Van Dyke actually "was" intended to play the deputy role, but he turned it down to play Dave Crabtree in My Mother the Car.
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Old 11-30-2016, 01:11 PM   #39
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Everyone on this thread should sometime read the recent book "Andy and Don" by Daniel de Vise. An excellent book that serves as a biography of both, along with a detailed look at their long friendship.

Apparently, Andy was always very loyal to those who were loyal to him, but had little use for people that he thought had betrayed him in one way or another. And, once he decided that someone had done him wrong, he held a grudge about it for years.

Andy grew up on the poor "working class" south side of Mt. Airy and the more "well to do" kids on the north side teased him and made fun of him and wanted nothing to do with him. UNTIL he became famous. There's a story about a busload of people form Mt. Airy traveling to New York to see him in "No Time For Sergeants", after the show they wanted to go backstage to see him and he sent the stage manager out to tell them all to go away. And after that he refused to go to Mt. Airy for years. And I don't blame him.

He also thought that Elinor Donahue had betrayed him by leaving the show after the first year. She was wise enough to see that her role on the show was going nowhere. Andy apparently didn't like doing love scenes. Also, she was about 11 years younger than he was and when on screen they looked more like an uncle and niece than a couple. And, according to Elinor, they were always taking her funny lines away and giving them to Don because he was just a funnier character and got a bigger laugh. But after she left, Andy had little to do with her and barely spoke when they'd see each other at Hollywood social events.

As opposed to Howard McNear (Floyd). Andy always felt that Howard was a true, loyal friend and stuck by him to the very end--even devising special props so that he could continue to be on the show after he had his stroke.
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Old 11-30-2016, 08:18 PM   #40
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Angry Once an Angry Jerk Always An Angry Jerk

First I should say I have always liked TAGS since I was a kid in the '60's and watched when it was first broadcast. But even back then I could see Andy's personality on the show went from carefree and laid back and jolly in the b/w years to being surly, grouchy, nasty and seemed to go around with a permanent mad-on ready to blow up at the slightest irritation at what he now considered all moronic rubes that he ran into.

In more recent years I have also read how Andy was really a nasty and mean jerk in real life. You can even see this small minded side of his personality in some small Matlock mannerisms.

Look, as much as I would like to think Andy was just as nice and sweet as he was in the b/w years, fact is he was a genuine nasty and angry jerk. He even seemed to turn on America itself when he publicly supported the thoroughly anti-American Obama. Andy, it seems just couldn't get over his own angers and grudges he held against anyone including his own country even though they did their best to embrace him . Now, he's met his own judgment, so be it.
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Old 12-01-2016, 12:53 PM   #41
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Ms. Hazel...

Did I say that Andy was as nice and sweet in real life as he was in the b&w years? No, only that the book I read about him explains a lot of why he was the way he was, and that in one case, I don't blame him. But yeah, you're right, there were many incidents over the years where he was--arguably--an angry jerk. Still, I like the characters he played.

That being said, Andy's personal political views have nothing to do with anything. But, since you brought it up, based on what you said about Obama I'll bet that you voted for Donald Trump. If you did, then you just voted for one of the most temperamental, thin-skinned, grudge-holding, angry jerks who have ever lived.
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Old 12-01-2016, 07:46 PM   #42
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A correction to note, I am all HE-MAN, proud American, & totally against anyone including your beloved commie Obama and Hillary to boot. Yes I proudly voted for someone who is already, BEFORE even being sworn in, is doing wonders for THIS country that Obama couldn't accomplish in 8 horrid apology world tour years. Just shameful, people like you who voted for the totally anti-constitution democrats, you need to hang your head in shame and re-think your reason for even living here in this, the once (8 years ago) greatest country in the world. I really really wish you commie lib democrats would keep your promise for just once and leave the country as you promised if the greatest president since Ronald Reagan would be proudly elected. I can only hope I can wave bye-bye to you anti-American bums. I understand your Heaven on earth, Cuba, has a new vacancy. I'd just love to see you commies move to an actual commie land to see what fools you are for yourself first hand. That is my fondest wish to you all.

Now that I've put you in your place, back to Andy. First off, who the heck are you to think I was addressing my comments about Jerky boy Andy to you. Believe it or not, the world doesn't revolve around you and you were not even in a single thought in my entire post. Hate to break it to you little Missy, but you just ain't that impotent.
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Old 08-24-2017, 02:16 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JAllen
TAGS is my favorite sitcom of all time, and will remain so. I have also heard the rumors about the "real-life" Andy, and frankly in many interviews (the one he did years ago with Ralph Emery on TNN comes to mind) some of that personality shows up. As an earlier poster stated, Griffith was likely a complicated individual who at times could be decent, and other times less than admirable. It is apparent that he did cultivate an entourage of actors, whom he remained true friends with, and whom he continued to use in Matlock. His friendships with Don Knotts and Ron Howard are apparently genuine. On the other hand if he didn't like someone, or vice-versa, this was apparently something that stuck. My conclusion is that Andy Griffith is a brilliant artist who is possessed with the stereotypical artistic temperament.

Jack Burns, a New Yorker, was ill-suited to play a deputy in rural North Carolina; not to mention the impossible task of following in Don Knotts' footsteps. The "Warren" character simply wasn't funny, and I find many of those episodes unwatchable. Later Burns' career as a comic took off in the 1970's when he teamed with Avery Schreiber, the taxi routine a classic. After Warren, Barney was more or less "replaced" by Goober, Howard, Emmit, Clara, et al folk depending on the story-line. Though the color episodes were not as good, that seemed to work pretty well, as the show really became about the town itself.

Speaking of Barney's "replacement," there is an interesting episode, the final one of the Don Knotts years. Ironically, it is an episode which didn't feature Knotts and in it Aunt Bea actually refers to Barney's position as deputy in the past-tense. It features Jerry Van Dyke as a banjo player who is fired from a carnival, and at one point decides to put on the deputy uniform, a decision which ultimately creates a few problems for Andy. I always wondered if that episode was meant to audition Van Dyke as the replacment, and didn't work out for whatever reason. I don't know if that is true, but that episode always makes me wonder.

One can say with a certain amount of confidence that George Lindsey and Griffith are not the best of chums. I read somewhere years ago that Lindsey was the original choice to play Gomer, until Griffith saw Jim Nabors perform a stand-up routine. Think of a hick version of Andy Kaufman's ill-at-ease immigrant stand-up who suddenly goes into the Elvis routine. Nabors would play a Gomer-type of character who would eventually begin singing in his famous baritone voice. Anyway, I believe it is possible that despite eventually winning a regular role on the show as Goober, Lindsey may have harbored some bitterness over being bumped from the first role. Then again that theory may be all wet.

Griffith and Lindsey did not get on that well during their tenure on TAGS. While they would go on camping/hunting trips with Jack Dodson and two other friends of Griffiths the majority of the time was spent with the two butting heads throughout the course of TAGS and into Mayberry RFD. However after the death of Don Knotts Griffith and Lindsey started to become on friendlier terms. As Griffith said in an interview after Lindsey's death "We often called each other to talk about how things we're going. Our relationship now is we can say "I love you" and mean it." I think
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Old 08-25-2017, 01:33 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flora Malherbe
I actually had the chance to meet Andy a couple of years ago at a BMI reception in Nashville. Not that this gives me tremendous insight into the man, but during that brief moment when I shook his hand and exchanged a few comments with him, he made me feel like I was the only person in hte room. He grippeb my hand, and paid me his full attention while I stammered out how much I enjoyed the shows and his contributions to the entertainment world.

I have read a lot about Andy, including many things he wrote. I also have met George Lindsey on numerous occasions and think highly of him. I know George much better than I will ever know Andy. So... who was right?

Both of them.

You guys go to school, have jobs, live in families. Everyone has their good days and their bad days. Some of the nicest people you know also have a bit of temper when they are under pressure, and some equally nice folks struggle with a chip on their shoulder. Most of you do, too, as well as myself. Andy and George both cme from poverty and the wrong side of the tracks. Both of them struggled hard to pull out of poverty and to find acceptance. George turned to alcohol. Andy had a temper. They were and remain fine men who struggled with the same kinds of problems you and I do. They were niether one perfect - they still aren't perfect. But Andy wanted badly to create something good, honest, even noble when he created a small town full of quirky people who managed to pull together more times than not to make something good out of a bad situation... much like Andy and George both tried to do with their own lives.

Most people who acieve celebrity do get tired of insensitive fans who want the celebrity to perform on the spot. It would be nice to think they would drop everything to greet every fan, perform every impromptu line or song, sign every autograph with a hige smile plastered on their face, no matter how busy they are, no matter if they are trying to have a private conversation with a friend over a meal, or are trying to get to their next meeting or the doctor's office - whatever. But NONE OF US could live that way - be on call to drop everything for fans at the drop of a hat and put real life on hold while we smile, sign, and pose for pictures.

We don't want to be judged on our worst moments and want people to see us as we really are. We want everyone to give us a break and understand our motives are good even if we do get tired and frustrated and our tempers flare at times.

On set Andy is remembered by most as a kind and generous mentor, who gave even young Ronnie Howard a say in how things went on the show. Did Andy have a temper at times? Yes. Is the sum total of the man much, much greater then the times his temper showed? Yes.

I have read both things about Andy, and I think that this above post says it very well. Personally, I am a school social worker, and I just had a conversation with my wife a few days ago about how I would like my students to remember me. I hope that they remember me positively, but there is no way all of them will, because there are some who caught me on a bad day, and that is the only interaction they had with me. Others, who didnt like what I had to say, may think I didnt do enough for them. I have tried, everyday, but sometimes you just don't get it done.

A person has to be "on" when you deal with the public, every minute of every day. I try to be, but it is exhausting (I have always worked in low income communities) when you are dealing with difficult situations constantly. Then we all have personal lives that spill over, and impact how we interact with others. So if a student talked me on the first few days of school, after all of my small children slept through the night, and my wife and I were getting along perfectly, and I was feeling physically great, they would think I was the nicest guy in the world! I had 5 close family members pass away last year. I bet I was not at my best a lot of the time. I still tried, but I went into a more self-preserving mode. So at the end of the year I was exhausted and burned out. I didnt have the best of me to give, though I tried.

Andy may have come to the same point, on a different scale, but a person becomes exhausted dealing with fame and everything that comes with it.

Andy was married three times, Barbara from 1949-1972, Solica from 1973-1981, and Cindi from 1983-2012 (his death). He adopted two children with his first wife. They may have struggled with infertility, and the sorrow, and in those days, stigma that would have brought. Wouldnt wish that on my worst enemy.

He clearly had a lot of pressures from the fame that his show brought him, as he continues to be a household name, though his show went off the air almost 50 years ago.

His son, Andy Jr., was an alcoholic who died in 1996 at the age of 38. It is miserable for a parent to out-live their child. That would make anyone look at life a little differently, and probably impact their mood, maybe permanently.

In sum, Andy brought us what I consider the pinnacle of Americana, the best television show of all time, full of morality tales, Faith and family values, and left his mark on all of us. The show reminds us of a simpler time, and a world that everyone would love to live in. For that contribution, he will always be remembered, and fondly. I think there was probably a lot of Andy Griffith in Sheriff Taylor, and like anyone, he had his good days and bad.

God Bless his memory.

Kevin
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