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Old 05-09-2012, 03:19 PM   #16
MrCleveland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Thong
I also think that the content of children's shows - cartoons in particular - got neutered by political correctness. All of a sudden, everything had to have a moral or a lesson associated with it.

A friend's son told me that the newer Bugs Bunny cartoons portray Elmer Fudd as a vegetarian who only target shoots -- he never hunts animals.

That's just wrong.

We were smart enough as kids to know that shotguns were to be taken seriously in real life and that you couldn't run off cliffs or have anvils dropped on your head and survive like Wile E. Coyote.

That's why I like "South Park"...even though they may have the most violence and profanity in a cartoon, it would usually end with Stan or Kyle saying "You know, I've learned something today..." then Cartman gets his fat-ass handed to someone!
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Old 05-10-2012, 02:25 AM   #17
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Technically the downfall started in the 70s when they were purging out all of the violence in children's shows but locals still aired classic cartoons and CBS still aired The Bugs Bunny Road Runner Show uncut. But it the Clinton administration that dealt Saturday morning cartoons the death blow with their E/I bs and now look at where we are now.
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Old 06-24-2012, 04:13 AM   #18
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I think several things killed the concept of Saturday morning cartoons on broadcast networks:
*The Children's Television Act of 1990 (which was really, the first incarnation of the E/I mandate) and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. This led to just about all of the networks (save for Fox and the WB, who I think got around that by exploiting loopholes) became preschool like w/ their Saturday morning programming. For NBC, all of their TNBC shows had to have a heavy-handed "moral to the story" at the end of their sitcoms (so in effect, every single episode was a "very special episode"). I mean, we have PBS for that type of programming. Peggy Charen is one of the worst people to ever come around children's programming. To put things in proper perspective, what happened w/ the Children's Television Act was essentially her ultimate goal dating back to the '60s I think (when she complained about cartoons being too violent).

*Media consolidation. This goes hand and hand w/ the Telecommunications Act of '96. We eventually got Disney buying ABC and Viacom buying or merging (I really don't remember) w/ CBS. In return, the Saturday morning programming became extremely uniform (you used to be able to see Disney shows on NBC like Gummie Bears or CBS like The Little Mermaid and Alladdin on CBS) and and "cable-ized" (i.e. Disney Channel sitcoms showing up on ABC and Nickelodeon/Nick Jr. shows showing up on CBS).

*The rise of 24 hour cable children's channels like Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network, Disney Channel, and the Hub. There really wasn't much of a need for those types of shows anymore when it's more than likely cheaper or more profitable for networks to air infomercials or Saturday editions of their morning news shows. It's kind of like how ESPN as it grew more and more powerful arguably made ABC's Wide World of Sports less and less unique or appealing.

*The popularity of live-action teen sitcoms like Saved by the Bell on NBC. I'm pretty sure that these types of shows were cheaper and faster to produce than animated shows. But at the same time, you can argue that NBC's animated fare by around 1991-'92 was seriously going downhill quality wise w/ shows like Yo! Yogi and Pro Stars (and really, a lot of the DiC produced shows on NBC from around this period).
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Old 06-24-2012, 10:46 PM   #19
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I miss the days of Flinstones,Smurfs,Bugs Bunny,Yogi,Muppet babies,Tail spin,Rescue rangers,Dark wing duck,Duck tails,Teenage mutant ninja turtles,Pound puppies,Care bears etc.Cartoons now days for the most part pale in comparison.
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Old 02-17-2013, 02:23 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMC
I think several things killed the concept of Saturday morning cartoons on broadcast networks:
*The Children's Television Act of 1990 (which was really, the first incarnation of the E/I mandate) and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. This led to just about all of the networks (save for Fox and the WB, who I think got around that by exploiting loopholes) became preschool like w/ their Saturday morning programming. For NBC, all of their TNBC shows had to have a heavy-handed "moral to the story" at the end of their sitcoms (so in effect, every single episode was a "very special episode"). I mean, we have PBS for that type of programming. Peggy Charen is one of the worst people to ever come around children's programming. To put things in proper perspective, what happened w/ the Children's Television Act was essentially her ultimate goal dating back to the '60s I think (when she complained about cartoons being too violent).

*Media consolidation. This goes hand and hand w/ the Telecommunications Act of '96. We eventually got Disney buying ABC and Viacom buying or merging (I really don't remember) w/ CBS. In return, the Saturday morning programming became extremely uniform (you used to be able to see Disney shows on NBC like Gummie Bears or CBS like The Little Mermaid and Alladdin on CBS) and and "cable-ized" (i.e. Disney Channel sitcoms showing up on ABC and Nickelodeon/Nick Jr. shows showing up on CBS).

*The rise of 24 hour cable children's channels like Nickelodeon, Cartoon Network, Disney Channel, and the Hub. There really wasn't much of a need for those types of shows anymore when it's more than likely cheaper or more profitable for networks to air infomercials or Saturday editions of their morning news shows. It's kind of like how ESPN as it grew more and more powerful arguably made ABC's Wide World of Sports less and less unique or appealing.

*The popularity of live-action teen sitcoms like Saved by the Bell on NBC. I'm pretty sure that these types of shows were cheaper and faster to produce than animated shows. But at the same time, you can argue that NBC's animated fare by around 1991-'92 was seriously going downhill quality wise w/ shows like Yo! Yogi and Pro Stars (and really, a lot of the DiC produced shows on NBC from around this period).


You've highlighted the various ways that Saturday mornings aren't the way they used to be. I'd like to add that the downfall of the content of such programming began in the mid-1960s, when ACT was formed by an over-zealous mom who decided Saturday morning programming was too violent and too commercialized. I'm 55 years old and have never murdered, thrown a bomb at or dropped an anvil on anyone. Yet I had to see my beloved "New Adventures of Superman" and "Superman-Aquaman Hour of Adventure" turned into the mushy "Superfriends". As I got older, I still kept an eye on cartoons, and by the early 70's the airwaves were awash with animated versions of older sitcoms ("I Dream of Jeannie", "Gilligan's Island"), the only good things remaining were "Scooby-Doo" and the various versions of "Archie". Virtually all local children's TV hosts were kicked off the air in the early 70's for having sponsors provide presents, prizes and snacks on the shows. Into the 80's things were worse, almost all cartoons delivered a message of non-violence so total that most characters weren't allowed to defend or stick up for themselves in much of a physical fashion. They had to "talk things over" with the villain/bully/perpetrator, then some sort of coincidental or magical resolution would present itself by the end of the show, and the protagonist would get his/her comeuppance. I wonder how many real life kids were praying that their real world bullies would suffer the same magical fate as the cartoon bully? A much more reasonable lesson can be found in a Brady Bunch episode (yes I know, not a cartoon) where Cindy is teased by an older boy for having a lisp. Her brother Peter tries to step in, but is intimidated by the bully. Dad Brady counsels him to talk things over, and of course that didn't work. Dad then goes to the home of the bully and finds that the whole family are a bunch of oafish slobs, then recommends to Peter that he still try to talk things over with the bully, but if that fails, zonk him. Which is what happened and was a much better life lesson for the young of the era than lame no-violence-under-any-circumstances ACT approved cartoons....
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Old 02-17-2013, 05:45 PM   #21
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I'm now thankful for Netflix and Hulu that has brought weekday and SatAM Cartoons. I'm also glad that I ditched cable since they stopped playing the cartoons of our yesteryear. When I see those cartoons...it's yesterday once more, just like The Carpenters song....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwxsWIYJI2A
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