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freshwater
04-23-2007, 01:26 PM
Remember that case of the woman (Patricia Stallings) sentenced to life in prison (and later released) for allegedly fatally poisoning her child, and it was later determined that he had a disease that essentially poisoned his blood?

The only thing that saved her was having another child while in prison, and that child had the same disease.

I have nothing profound to say about it, other than I wonder how she and her family are doing today.

It was a pretty interesting/bizarre/heartbreaking case.

dynoguy88
04-23-2007, 07:50 PM
That was yet another case of blatant police stupidity. The main thing they were able to arrest Patricia for was her son becoming violently ill after a short visit they had while Ryan was temporarily out of his parents custody. During a 5 minute time period, Patricia was left alone with Ryan. But amazingly, Ryan didn't become that ill until a full 72 hours AFTER that visit.

What kind of poision can enter your system but take 3 whole days before it makes you sick and eventually kill you? Does such a substance even exist? :rolleyes:

The Flying Dutchmans
04-26-2007, 03:48 PM
I think a TV movie was done on this story, and she had a 2nd son and he had the same problem the first son had that killed him, and they discovered this while she was in prison, I believe she had a total moron for an attorney, well the actor who played charles in mash, david ogden stiers played her 2nd attorney who was very smart and got her freed from prison. as I recall she didnt trust her 2nd attorney because she thought he would railroad her like the 1st one did and it took some time for the 2nd lawyer to gain her trust but he did. it was a very good movie.

leafygreens
04-26-2007, 04:28 PM
That was yet another case of blatant police stupidity.

Sounds like part of that Child Abuse Witch Hunt that went on in the early 90's.







.

WeaverCarterFan
04-27-2007, 05:58 PM
I always had a feeling that this movie I've seen was based on this case and I'm pretty sure it is. It's a really good movie it's called Falsely Accused it was just on Lifetime Movie Network (I believe) a few days ago. If anyone hasn't seen it they should.

sdb4884
05-05-2010, 12:56 PM
Unbelivable police and attorney stupidity that sadly happens to people a lot and lucky UM are there to save the day.

mattc
05-05-2010, 02:14 PM
that's the amazing thing about this case: If I recall, were it not for UM profiling this story, and several doctors watching the program, and then coming forward, she would probably still be in prison.

Isn't it scary to think that a fluke was basically the only thing that kept her from being deemed a child killer? Haunting.

Mystery Man
05-05-2010, 04:47 PM
First UM segment I saw. :) Always thought she was innocent.

Clockworkhigh
05-05-2010, 10:25 PM
At least on the surface, it seemed like her and her husband put the bitterness aside towards the police and were just happy to be a family again. What a story they will be able to tell their kid(s) someday though. Amazing incompetence though by the police, how can that happen?

SageSlowdive
11-06-2010, 02:00 PM
This case was OUTRAGEOUS!

Probably gets my vote as the worst police blunders ever profiled on UM - next to the Eileen Mangold case, of course.

mah79
11-06-2010, 09:08 PM
Hi Everyone,
I seem to recall seeing an MSNBC news documentary on the Stallings case, sometime earlier this year. Sadly, it said that David and Patty Stallings divorced, that the trauma of Ryan's death and then Patty's sentencing was just too much. My heart really went out to them, with all that they endured. The MSNBC special also interviewed the arrogant DA, and it said that he retired. My blood boils thinking of how he could send an innocent mother to jail and just break up a family like that. As i watch the Stallings case I cannot even begin to imagine the pain that Patty must have gone through, to lose her baby to a devastating disease, and to have almost been sent to prison for the rest of her life, for a crime she never committed.
On a side note, has there every been any update on David Jr? He would be almost 20 years old today. (Ryan would have turned 20 last year.)

TheCars1986
11-10-2010, 08:03 PM
Isn't it sad that it seems like when law enforcement gets ahold of a suspect, they zero in on said suspect and do not follow up any other leads? And if that person is convicted they sure as hell don't seem like they want to admit they were wrong so they keep that innocent person locked away. Very sad. Patricia is a prime example of this.

Guardian
11-10-2010, 09:49 PM
The only thing I would have to add here is that if you put yourselves in the police's shoes, the doctors are telling you that the kid was poisoned. The kid is taken away from the family and appears to get better. Then a couple days after a visit with the mother, the kid gets sick again. So the doctors keep insisting that the kid was poisoned.

It's very sad of course, but what would you do as a cop on the case? Based on the info they had, they probably felt they were doing the right thing to protect the kid. While there are indeed cases where the police screw up big time (they are human too after all) I don't think anyone can say for sure that they would be comfortable just letting the kid go with the parents.

What if they had and the kid actually had been poisoned? Then everyone on the board would be debating on why the police didn't take the kid away after the first incident.

As I said, the case is very sad. Heartbreaking even. But you gotta give the police some breathing room. I am sure they weren't sitting in there offices and planning how to break up this family and falsely accuse someone of murder. They were doing what they thought was right based on the information they had.

If nothing else, perhaps this case helped to raise some awareness in the medical community on this illness so that this will not happen again.

rhzunam
11-11-2010, 12:20 AM
This case is really weird because when I was little I saw that TV movie in a spanish tv station and always remembered the case eventhough I never watch those types of movies. Years and years later and I see the case again on UM for the first time.

This has to be one of the stupidest things the police have ever done. And you know why it is stupid guardian? Because in the interview UM does, they already learned that the 2nd kid had a extremely rare genetic disease that had very similiar symptoms to those that happened when the 1st kid died. And yet when they asked the DA on the UM show about that he said "It wasn't relevant". You mean to tell me the 2nd child of a couple having an extremely rare genetic disease isn't relevant when investigating the death of the 1st child of the couple? Seriously? ". I could agree about the case at first seeming like it was poison but once the 2nd kid had been diagnosed, it definitely should have been cleared and it MUST CERTAINLY be relevant. Instead they had to have all those doctors appear after UM for them to consider how that information could be relevant for the case:rolleyes:

TheCars1986
11-11-2010, 08:36 AM
I was just saying that in some cases, as soon as police have a suspect that they feel is responsible they will not consider any other possible suspects or explanations. And if they get a conviction especially, they would have to publically admit that not only were they, law enforcement wrong but also the entire judicial process. And that's a hard pill to swallow sometimes to publically come out and admit that an innocent person has been wrongfully jailed. Which is kind of what happened with Patricia, IMO.

dks64
11-11-2010, 12:51 PM
The only thing I would have to add here is that if you put yourselves in the police's shoes, the doctors are telling you that the kid was poisoned. The kid is taken away from the family and appears to get better. Then a couple days after a visit with the mother, the kid gets sick again. So the doctors keep insisting that the kid was poisoned.

It's very sad of course, but what would you do as a cop on the case? Based on the info they had, they probably felt they were doing the right thing to protect the kid. While there are indeed cases where the police screw up big time (they are human too after all) I don't think anyone can say for sure that they would be comfortable just letting the kid go with the parents.

What if they had and the kid actually had been poisoned? Then everyone on the board would be debating on why the police didn't take the kid away after the first incident.

As I said, the case is very sad. Heartbreaking even. But you gotta give the police some breathing room. I am sure they weren't sitting in there offices and planning how to break up this family and falsely accuse someone of murder. They were doing what they thought was right based on the information they had.

If nothing else, perhaps this case helped to raise some awareness in the medical community on this illness so that this will not happen again.

That's how I see it too. Very sad for the Mother and baby, but the police are human and acted with the information they had.


ETA: I'm watching episodes I have saved on my DVR and this case came on. I haven't seen it in years, but I remember it VERY well.

wiseguy182
12-17-2014, 07:38 AM
Yowza.

I just watched the first segment of the Forensic Files episode, and literally had my mind blown.

-Stated that while Patty Stallings was driving, she accidentally made a wrong turn and got lost for a period of time and ended up at a different hospital than the one she intended to go to. In several different ways, that could have had a huge effect on things.

-Patty had a third son, who was 5 years old at the time of Ryan's death, who had been born out of wedlock and prior to her meeting David. The child was taken away from her due to him having malnutrition and frostbite. Patty's explanation for this was that she was poor at the time and unable to properly take care of the child and that she too was experiencing malnutrition and frostbite.

I think that may help explain why the police acted as quickly as they did, at least initially, since Patty apparently had a questionable past.

RobinW
12-17-2014, 01:53 PM
Yeah, honestly, I couldn't really fault the police for going after Patty at the outset since they were in a pretty impossible situation. It's not like this was a case where you could just pursue other leads and suspects. They learned that a mother might be poisoning her child and the fallback would be much worse if they did nothing about it. But the inexcusable part was refusing to admit they might be wrong and ignoring the blatantly evidence that supported Patty's innocence after she was charged.

SPD Yellow
12-17-2014, 03:47 PM
Yeah, wiseguy, on the basis of what you mentioned, don't find it too hard to understand why the police focused on Patty. Not to mention, basic rule of homicide: the killer is usually whoever's closest to the victim, like say a lover or a parent. As a result, police tend to start from the victim's inner circle and work their way out when investigating possible homicides.

Cori aka ChrisSCrush
12-17-2014, 09:19 PM
I think that may help explain why the police acted as quickly as they did, at least initially, since Patty apparently had a questionable past.

UM seems to have done a whitewash job on some subjects. One case would be that of Nicholas Markowitz, who they portrayed as a well-adjusted teenager from a loving home who had never been in trouble. The episode left a huge question as to why he would stay away from home for so long without calling his parents to pick him up, or at least to let them know where he was. He had been kidnapped by Jesse James Hollywood and crew but was allowed enough freedom to have access to phones and such. It turns out he actually had been in trouble and when they picked him up was in fact in the process of running away from home--thus explaining his failure to phone!

wiseguy182
12-19-2014, 01:26 AM
the shockers keep coming...

The FF episode stated that had Patty made it to the hospital she originally intended, that there was staff there that were familiar with MMA. Not only could she have possibly avoided this entire legal nightmare, but Ryan may very well have lived as he was mis-diagnosed at the other hospital and given the wrong treatment that actually made his condition worse! Unfortunately, Patty made one wrong turn and it had HORRIBLE consequences!

When Patty's "guilty" verdict was read, David collapsed and went into shock and had to be taken to the hospital himself via ambulance.

Another thing that aroused suspicions was when someone from the hospital called her to inform her of Ryan's death. Patty, who was behind bars at this point, allegedly said something to the effect of "I don't care about that, I just want to speak to my husband." So yeah, I think this and other things make me think Patty didn't do herself any favors.

As I'm sure most of you know, UM was very instrumental in solving the case. Not only was UM not mentioned on the FF episode, but it was implied that the case was solved through other means. :(

I'm not a chemistry expert, so this part is a bit confusing for me, but the tests conducted on the baby bottle and such (which was put Patty in prison) were severely flawed. They had the doctor from Yale on there (he was also in the UM update), and he called the results "garbage".

Patty's lawyer was not a very good one as he left the lab results unchallenged, while the prosecution produced several "experts". This was a large reason Patty got convicted.

Cori aka ChrisSCrush
12-19-2014, 02:48 AM
So yeah, I think this and other things make me think Patty didn't do herself any favors.

Wow, similarities to the Chamberlain dingo case! http://lindychamberlain.com/the-story/ The mother was telling the truth...the public just didn't like her religion, or her. Also there is the still-unsolved Sabrina Paige Aisenberg case.

As I'm sure most of you know, UM was very instrumental in solving the case. Not only was UM not mentioned on the FF episode, but it was implied that the case was solved through other means. :(

Again, UM gets no respect! :mumble: No respect, I tell ya! :soapbox:

Patty's lawyer was not a very good one as he left the lab results unchallenged, while the prosecution produced several "experts". This was a large reason Patty got convicted.

Hopefully something was done about this yutz as well. ohno:

LooksLikeCRicci
12-19-2014, 11:11 AM
lso there is the still-unsolved Sabrina Paige Aisenberg case.

Dude, we've covered this EXTENSIVELY in another thread: Sabrina was clearly abducted by poltergeists. :schmack:

Okay, getting back on topic: After wiseguy's revelations, I can understand why law enforcement would zero in on the mother, especially given the allegations of neglectful parenting in the past.

I am baffled, however, that many wanted to dismiss the genetic condition of the newborn son as "irrelevant." Yeah, not so much. I'm very much an idealist, but if I'm putting someone in prison for the rest of their lives, I'd like to make sure it's the RIGHT PERSON so, you know, I can sleep at night and look my kid in the eye when I tell her that I'm keeping kids safe.

I'm sorry to hear about the Stallings getting divorced. However, I think if you pull statistics about couples who lose a child, the divorce rate is incredibly high. That's without adding the incarceration factor.

justins5256
12-19-2014, 11:44 AM
Even though she turned out to be innocent, it sounds like UM really whitewashed their presentation of this case.

tarheelslim
12-19-2014, 12:24 PM
I just watched the first segment of the Forensic Files episode, and literally had my mind blown.

Wait, you *literally* had your mind blown?!

;)

LooksLikeCRicci
12-19-2014, 04:50 PM
Wait, you *literally* had your mind blown?!

;)

Man, I bet that was messy. :)

wiseguy182
12-20-2014, 12:34 AM
Wait, you *literally* had your mind blown?!

;)

I quote Gorilla Monsoon all the time, and he was pretty well known for his frequent misuse of the word "literally". :lol:

For example, "They're literally hanging from the rafters!" is something he used to say all the time. Nobody really hung from the rafters! :lol:

Cori aka ChrisSCrush
12-20-2014, 03:48 AM
Yowza.

I just watched the first segment of the Forensic Files episode, and literally had my mind blown.

:explode:

tarheelslim
12-22-2014, 02:46 PM
I quote Gorilla Monsoon all the time, and he was pretty well known for his frequent misuse of the word "literally". :lol:

For example, "They're literally hanging from the rafters!" is something he used to say all the time. Nobody really hung from the rafters! :lol:

That is hilarious... I haven't seen Monsoon since I was too young to even know what literally meant so I've not had the chance to appreciate it

wiseguy182
12-22-2014, 03:14 PM
That is hilarious... I haven't seen Monsoon since I was too young to even know what literally meant so I've not had the chance to appreciate it

I catch myself quoting him all the time without even realizing it at first. And then a few seconds later, I realize where I got the quote from.

I have a running list of all of his catch phrases. Right now it's at 79.

I like to joke that there isn't a situation that could happen in your life that can't be summed up with a quote from Gorilla Monsoon.