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View Full Version : America's Most Wanted: How Television Catches Crooks (1990 book)


Kane
01-20-2007, 05:46 PM
John Walsh has written three books that discussed his show America's Most Wanted: Tears of Rage (1997), No Mercy (1998), and Public Enemies (2001). However, those weren't the only books that covered the topic on the show. There was a book that was published years earlier: America's Most Wanted: How Television Catches Crooks.

Written by Jack Breslin, it was released in 1990, just two years after the show's debut. It discusses a number of things, including the creation of the show. Admittedly, I have never read the book, but I do recall coming across a book on the show at a local book store in the early 1990s. Now looking back on it, the book in question was probably titled AMW: How Television Catches Crooks.

As I was reading an Amazon review of the book, I learned that Rudolph Giuliani was under consideration for the hosting job. He'd already had a history as a successful New York prosecutor, but he had political ambitions (which, of course, resulted in him becoming mayor of New York City). The Fox network decided against hiring him, because of concern that Giuliani might only use the show as a stepping stone to his political career. In retrospect, it was a wise decision.

LooksLikeCRicci
01-30-2007, 02:04 AM
Giuliani... he WOULD have been a good choice, although I echo the thoughts about him using the show as a political platform.

Tears of Rage is, by far, one of THE BEST books I have ever read. I picked it up in a clearance bin in Borders a few years ago. When I read it, I COULD. NOT. PUT. IT. DOWN. I know that it was written primarily by a ghostwriter, but you really felt as if you were on that rollercoaster with the Walsh family while they were frantically looking for Adam. I have a great deal of respect for John Walsh for channelling his rage into something so positive.

Kane
01-30-2007, 08:43 AM
Giuliani... he WOULD have been a good choice, although I echo the thoughts about him using the show as a political platform.

From what I read about that, it was clear to me that Fox didn't want someone who would host the show for a few years, and then quit to fulfill another professional goal. They obviously wanted a permanent host, one that would be consistently devoted to the job and show. It seems to me that Fox didn't want to go through the pain of having to hire a new host every few years, and understandably so. If it hadn't been for Rudy Giuliani's political ambitions, Fox might have been more willing to consider hiring him.

Besides, AMW already goes through enough trouble finding actors to participate in reenactments. So more than likely, the idea of seeking a new host every now and then would have have only added to the stress.